Friday, July 25, 2014

James Goodman, Staff writer 10:49 p.m. EDT July 24, 2014




21 LINKEDIN MORE

Students and alumni of Hobart and William Smith Colleges are urging changes in how allegations of sexual misconduct are handled in the aftermath of a recent New York Times story telling how the colleges mishandled a rape complaint by a student.


Hobart and William Smith officials have defended their response to a rape of an 18-year-old freshman that is alleged to have happened at the outset of last school year. The student, identified as Anna, reported that three football players sexually assaulted her at a fraternity party. A disciplinary panel at the Geneva-based colleges cleared the students of wrongdoing. No criminal charges were filed.


But Hobart and William Smith officials, while disputing the Times' interpretation of events and portrayal of the colleges, say that changes are forthcoming.


"There will be changes in policies and procedures for adjudication of allegations of sexual misconduct. They will be in place before the fall semester," said Robert Flowers, vice president for student affairs at Hobart and William Smith and the official who reviewed the panel's finding that cleared the three students.


The Coalition of Concerned Students had 3,971 signatures Thursday on an online petition that says they are "horrified by the New York Times article exposing the administration's mismanagement of a campus sexual assault case."


Among the changes called for by the coalition is the appointment of "qualified individuals" to serve on the adjudication panel that reviews allegations of sexual assault.


Other changes sought include requiring the mandated rape prevention and student life seminars to focus on bystander intervention in such cases.


Another group, HWS Community for Change, was started by alumni of Hobart and William Smith. Its Facebook page, William Smith Stands with Anna, features five recommendations for Hobart and William Smith President Mark Gearan.


One of the recommendation is to "create transparency for and inclusion of stakeholders (students, faculty and alumni) in the review committee being assembled" to look at possible changes in procedures and policies.


Gretchen Sword, who is a 2006 Hobart and William Smith graduate and spokeswoman for Community for Change, said that her group and the students' group are collaborating.


"We are not only working together; we have a longer document that has been submitted to the leadership of the colleges," Sword said.


A meeting with representatives of both groups and the administration of Hobart and William Smith, Sword noted, is expected next week or the week after. It will not be open to the media.


"We would like to have a conversation that helps us understand what happened and how to move forward," she said.


David Grome, who is a 2007 Hobart and William Smith graduate, participated in the conference call that led to the Community for Change's recommendations.


"For me, it goes beyond the administration to the community. We all have to accept responsibility as members of the college's community to stay engaged in this," said Grome, 29, of Rochester.


In a July 16 letter to the Hobart and William Smith community, Gearan told of a group of faculty, staff, students and alumni working on a review of the colleges' processes for handling sexual misconduct cases.


"They will submit recommendations to me this summer," Gearan said.


Hobart and William Smith's prevention and education curriculum on issues related to sexual misconduct will be expanded.


Additional training will be provided for those involved with the response, investigation and adjudication of sexual misconduct complaints, Gearan noted.


As it is, lawyers not on the staff of Hobart and William Smith have been investigating sexual misconduct allegations since last fall, Flowers said.


The national spotlight has focused on Hobart and William Smith at a time sexual misconduct on campuses is coming under greater scrutiny.


On Thursday, Ohio State University fired the director of its marching band, Jonathan Waters, as it is expanding an internal investigation that found a deep culture of sexual harassment among students, reported The Columbus Dispatch.


The ouster of Waters came after a two-month probe, triggered by a complaint by a parent, that revealed extensive evidence that students routinely harassed one another — with new band members often targeted — and that Waters was aware or should have known about the abuse.


A new report released by Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., found that many of America's colleges and universities are failing to comply with federal laws and key policies designed to combat sexual assault on their campuses.


Her office polled 350 institutions of higher education and found major gaps in how schools report, investigate and resolve allegations of rape on college campuses.


Among the findings:


• Universities don't know the scope of the problem. Only 16 percent of schools conduct so-called climate surveys aimed at determining the prevalence of sexual assault on campus.


• Many schools do not make it easy for victims to report attacks anonymously. Only about half of U.S. colleges have a hotline that victims can call to report a sexual assault.


• Sexual assault charges often are not investigated. More than 40 percent of schools said they had not conducted a single sexual assault investigation in the past five years, even though some of those same institutions reported sexual violence incidents to the U.S. Department of Education in that same period.


• Many schools do not provide training to faculty, staff or students. About 20 percent of universities said they don't provide training to faculty and staff for how to respond to a sexual assault allegation.


"These problems affect nearly every stage of the institutions' response to sexual violence," the report concludes. "Many institutions are failing to comply with the law and best practices in how they handle sexual violence among students."


JGOODMAN@Democratand Chronicle.com


http://ift.tt/1vmdLIW


Includes reporting by Deirdre Shesgreen of the Gannett Washington bureau.


21 LINKEDIN MORE

Read or Share this story: http://on.rocne.ws/1mJlr06



Hobart and William Smith Colleges to change policies on sex misconduct cases - Rochester Democrat and Chronicle

James Goodman, Staff writer 10:49 p.m. EDT July 24, 2014




21 LINKEDIN MORE

Students and alumni of Hobart and William Smith Colleges are urging changes in how allegations of sexual misconduct are handled in the aftermath of a recent New York Times story telling how the colleges mishandled a rape complaint by a student.


Hobart and William Smith officials have defended their response to a rape of an 18-year-old freshman that is alleged to have happened at the outset of last school year. The student, identified as Anna, reported that three football players sexually assaulted her at a fraternity party. A disciplinary panel at the Geneva-based colleges cleared the students of wrongdoing. No criminal charges were filed.


But Hobart and William Smith officials, while disputing the Times' interpretation of events and portrayal of the colleges, say that changes are forthcoming.


"There will be changes in policies and procedures for adjudication of allegations of sexual misconduct. They will be in place before the fall semester," said Robert Flowers, vice president for student affairs at Hobart and William Smith and the official who reviewed the panel's finding that cleared the three students.


The Coalition of Concerned Students had 3,971 signatures Thursday on an online petition that says they are "horrified by the New York Times article exposing the administration's mismanagement of a campus sexual assault case."


Among the changes called for by the coalition is the appointment of "qualified individuals" to serve on the adjudication panel that reviews allegations of sexual assault.


Other changes sought include requiring the mandated rape prevention and student life seminars to focus on bystander intervention in such cases.


Another group, HWS Community for Change, was started by alumni of Hobart and William Smith. Its Facebook page, William Smith Stands with Anna, features five recommendations for Hobart and William Smith President Mark Gearan.


One of the recommendation is to "create transparency for and inclusion of stakeholders (students, faculty and alumni) in the review committee being assembled" to look at possible changes in procedures and policies.


Gretchen Sword, who is a 2006 Hobart and William Smith graduate and spokeswoman for Community for Change, said that her group and the students' group are collaborating.


"We are not only working together; we have a longer document that has been submitted to the leadership of the colleges," Sword said.


A meeting with representatives of both groups and the administration of Hobart and William Smith, Sword noted, is expected next week or the week after. It will not be open to the media.


"We would like to have a conversation that helps us understand what happened and how to move forward," she said.


David Grome, who is a 2007 Hobart and William Smith graduate, participated in the conference call that led to the Community for Change's recommendations.


"For me, it goes beyond the administration to the community. We all have to accept responsibility as members of the college's community to stay engaged in this," said Grome, 29, of Rochester.


In a July 16 letter to the Hobart and William Smith community, Gearan told of a group of faculty, staff, students and alumni working on a review of the colleges' processes for handling sexual misconduct cases.


"They will submit recommendations to me this summer," Gearan said.


Hobart and William Smith's prevention and education curriculum on issues related to sexual misconduct will be expanded.


Additional training will be provided for those involved with the response, investigation and adjudication of sexual misconduct complaints, Gearan noted.


As it is, lawyers not on the staff of Hobart and William Smith have been investigating sexual misconduct allegations since last fall, Flowers said.


The national spotlight has focused on Hobart and William Smith at a time sexual misconduct on campuses is coming under greater scrutiny.


On Thursday, Ohio State University fired the director of its marching band, Jonathan Waters, as it is expanding an internal investigation that found a deep culture of sexual harassment among students, reported The Columbus Dispatch.


The ouster of Waters came after a two-month probe, triggered by a complaint by a parent, that revealed extensive evidence that students routinely harassed one another — with new band members often targeted — and that Waters was aware or should have known about the abuse.


A new report released by Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., found that many of America's colleges and universities are failing to comply with federal laws and key policies designed to combat sexual assault on their campuses.


Her office polled 350 institutions of higher education and found major gaps in how schools report, investigate and resolve allegations of rape on college campuses.


Among the findings:


• Universities don't know the scope of the problem. Only 16 percent of schools conduct so-called climate surveys aimed at determining the prevalence of sexual assault on campus.


• Many schools do not make it easy for victims to report attacks anonymously. Only about half of U.S. colleges have a hotline that victims can call to report a sexual assault.


• Sexual assault charges often are not investigated. More than 40 percent of schools said they had not conducted a single sexual assault investigation in the past five years, even though some of those same institutions reported sexual violence incidents to the U.S. Department of Education in that same period.


• Many schools do not provide training to faculty, staff or students. About 20 percent of universities said they don't provide training to faculty and staff for how to respond to a sexual assault allegation.


"These problems affect nearly every stage of the institutions' response to sexual violence," the report concludes. "Many institutions are failing to comply with the law and best practices in how they handle sexual violence among students."


JGOODMAN@Democratand Chronicle.com


http://ift.tt/1vmdLIW


Includes reporting by Deirdre Shesgreen of the Gannett Washington bureau.


21 LINKEDIN MORE

Read or Share this story: http://on.rocne.ws/1mJlr06



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The white line shows one few parking spaces front Brickie Gyros 3rd Street Hobart. The owner is seeking more parking

The white line shows one of a few parking spaces in front of Brickie Gyros on 3rd Street in Hobart. The owner is seeking more parking spaces. | Karen Caffarini~for Sun-Times Media



storyidforme: 69264148

tmspicid: 24568984

fileheaderid: 12269953


Updated: July 23, 2014 10:52PM


HOBART — City staff is looking for a way to solve a business owner’s need for more parking spaces without making the traffic situation near the East Third Street bridge any more precarious.


Lana Wuest, owner of Brickies Gyros at 431 E. Third St., asked the Board of Public Works and Safety to allow additional parking spaces close to her business. She said there are no parking spaces west of her business.


“I’m losing spaces instead of gaining them,” she told the board.


Mayor Brian Snedecor said the best place to add parking might be by the bridge, where yellow curbing is marked.


Police Chief Richard Zormier said traffic flow in the area just off Main Street is precarious already.


“Additional parking on the bridge wouldn’t work. Parking on the west side could still cause difficulty,” Zormier said.


Complaints of speeding traffic in that area by a neighboring business owner resulted in the loss of one parking space earlier this summer as part of a solution.


To slow down motorists, the city painted striping on the street near the clocktower to indicate a pedestrian crosswalk and placed a pylon on each side of the crosswalk as a temporary fix.


City Engineer Phil Gralik said it was the best he could do for the time being. He said a better solution would be made along with Americans With Disabilities-accessible ramps and curbs, when the city does the downtown streetscape plan.


At the time, Gralik said he wanted to keep the parking along 3rd Street because he believes it has a calming effect on traffic.


He told the Board of Works he would look into Wuest’s situation and see what the travel lane width would be with additional parking.


In other matters, resident Robert Erickson was told he would have to go to the plan commission along with other residents in the area to have the unimproved section of Illinois Street near his house vacated if he wants to install a fence on his property there.


“I don’t se any value in putting Illinois Street through there. It might be time to visit it in its entirety with all the homeowners involved,” Board of Works member Thomas Ehrhardt said.


City Planner Sergio Mendoza said if the street is vacated, it needs to be the whole street, not just the portion abutting Erickson’s home in the 300 block of Linda Street.


Mendoza said all the property owners need to have a say on whether the street’s vacated because the property would go back to the homeowners, who would in turn have to pay taxes on their new additional land.


Erickson wanted permission to erect a fence, saying he would remove it if the city needs access to the easement, or install four gates that would provide easy access to city vehicles. He also suggested installing a bridge.






Hobart eyes solutions for business parking - Post-Tribune





The white line shows one few parking spaces front Brickie Gyros 3rd Street Hobart. The owner is seeking more parking

The white line shows one of a few parking spaces in front of Brickie Gyros on 3rd Street in Hobart. The owner is seeking more parking spaces. | Karen Caffarini~for Sun-Times Media



storyidforme: 69264148

tmspicid: 24568984

fileheaderid: 12269953


Updated: July 23, 2014 10:52PM


HOBART — City staff is looking for a way to solve a business owner’s need for more parking spaces without making the traffic situation near the East Third Street bridge any more precarious.


Lana Wuest, owner of Brickies Gyros at 431 E. Third St., asked the Board of Public Works and Safety to allow additional parking spaces close to her business. She said there are no parking spaces west of her business.


“I’m losing spaces instead of gaining them,” she told the board.


Mayor Brian Snedecor said the best place to add parking might be by the bridge, where yellow curbing is marked.


Police Chief Richard Zormier said traffic flow in the area just off Main Street is precarious already.


“Additional parking on the bridge wouldn’t work. Parking on the west side could still cause difficulty,” Zormier said.


Complaints of speeding traffic in that area by a neighboring business owner resulted in the loss of one parking space earlier this summer as part of a solution.


To slow down motorists, the city painted striping on the street near the clocktower to indicate a pedestrian crosswalk and placed a pylon on each side of the crosswalk as a temporary fix.


City Engineer Phil Gralik said it was the best he could do for the time being. He said a better solution would be made along with Americans With Disabilities-accessible ramps and curbs, when the city does the downtown streetscape plan.


At the time, Gralik said he wanted to keep the parking along 3rd Street because he believes it has a calming effect on traffic.


He told the Board of Works he would look into Wuest’s situation and see what the travel lane width would be with additional parking.


In other matters, resident Robert Erickson was told he would have to go to the plan commission along with other residents in the area to have the unimproved section of Illinois Street near his house vacated if he wants to install a fence on his property there.


“I don’t se any value in putting Illinois Street through there. It might be time to visit it in its entirety with all the homeowners involved,” Board of Works member Thomas Ehrhardt said.


City Planner Sergio Mendoza said if the street is vacated, it needs to be the whole street, not just the portion abutting Erickson’s home in the 300 block of Linda Street.


Mendoza said all the property owners need to have a say on whether the street’s vacated because the property would go back to the homeowners, who would in turn have to pay taxes on their new additional land.


Erickson wanted permission to erect a fence, saying he would remove it if the city needs access to the easement, or install four gates that would provide easy access to city vehicles. He also suggested installing a bridge.






This entry was posted in :





Steve Balash | Phoprovided

Steve Balash | Photo provided



storyidforme: 69520998

tmspicid: 24624575

fileheaderid: 12306534




If you go


A car wash will be held from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday at the following locations to raise funds for Balash. Rain date is Sunday, also from noon to 4 p.m.


Hobart High School, 2211 E. 10th St., Hobart, IN 46342; Joan Martin Elementary School, 301 E. 10th St., Hobart, IN 46342; Mundell Field between Home Avenue, Wisconsin Street, Cleveland Avenue and Delaware Street.


To donate


Please visit http://ift.tt/1pdpxz7 if you’d like to make a cash donation.




Updated: July 23, 2014 4:58PM


HOBART – The City of Hobart is coming together to help Steve Balash, teacher and multisport coach of 42 years, and asking the greater community to join them.


A car wash will be held Saturday to offset medical expenses, and an online fundraiser will continue through Saturday as well.


Balash has been suffering an unknown illness for the past year causing severe weight loss, neuropathy, sleep loss and other debilitating symptoms. His doctors are at a loss for a diagnosis.


“He’s just such a caring and kind person that the community of Hobart just wants to extend the love and affection that he has shown his athletes and students in the past 42 years,” said Hobart resident and fundraising organizer Jennifer Zoladz.


Balash attended Hobart schools from kindergarten through high school, and returned as a teacher and coach. He has produced 140 sectional championships, 46 regional championships, 15 semi-state championships and eight state championships coaching football, wrestling and track over the past five decades.


“That type of accomplishment will not be matched or duplicated any time soon,” said Hobart High School Athletic Director Robert Glover, who has known Balash for more than 40 years. “That speaks volumes. They broke the mold.”






© 2014 Sun-Times Media, LLC. All rights reserved. This material may not be copied or distributed without permission. For more information about reprints and permissions, visit http://ift.tt/OHef7a. To order a reprint of this article, click here.


Car washes set to help ailing Hobart coach - Post-Tribune






Steve Balash | Phoprovided

Steve Balash | Photo provided



storyidforme: 69520998

tmspicid: 24624575

fileheaderid: 12306534




If you go


A car wash will be held from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday at the following locations to raise funds for Balash. Rain date is Sunday, also from noon to 4 p.m.


Hobart High School, 2211 E. 10th St., Hobart, IN 46342; Joan Martin Elementary School, 301 E. 10th St., Hobart, IN 46342; Mundell Field between Home Avenue, Wisconsin Street, Cleveland Avenue and Delaware Street.


To donate


Please visit http://ift.tt/1pdpxz7 if you’d like to make a cash donation.




Updated: July 23, 2014 4:58PM


HOBART – The City of Hobart is coming together to help Steve Balash, teacher and multisport coach of 42 years, and asking the greater community to join them.


A car wash will be held Saturday to offset medical expenses, and an online fundraiser will continue through Saturday as well.


Balash has been suffering an unknown illness for the past year causing severe weight loss, neuropathy, sleep loss and other debilitating symptoms. His doctors are at a loss for a diagnosis.


“He’s just such a caring and kind person that the community of Hobart just wants to extend the love and affection that he has shown his athletes and students in the past 42 years,” said Hobart resident and fundraising organizer Jennifer Zoladz.


Balash attended Hobart schools from kindergarten through high school, and returned as a teacher and coach. He has produced 140 sectional championships, 46 regional championships, 15 semi-state championships and eight state championships coaching football, wrestling and track over the past five decades.


“That type of accomplishment will not be matched or duplicated any time soon,” said Hobart High School Athletic Director Robert Glover, who has known Balash for more than 40 years. “That speaks volumes. They broke the mold.”






© 2014 Sun-Times Media, LLC. All rights reserved. This material may not be copied or distributed without permission. For more information about reprints and permissions, visit http://ift.tt/OHef7a. To order a reprint of this article, click here.


This entry was posted in :

2014-07-23T23:15:00Z 2014-07-24T06:49:06Z 5 agencies respond to fire that damages vacant Hobart houseTimes Staff nwitimes.com



HOBART | A fire damaged an unoccupied home late Wednesday in Hobart.


The cause of the fire at the single-family home in the 1200 block of South Hobart Road remains under investigation, said Bob Scott, lead fire investigator and Hobart EMS director.


Firefighters responded to the house between 9:15 and 9:30 p.m. Neighbors reportedly told police they heard a boom and saw fire. Police arrived first and saw fire coming from the front of the house, which is tucked away on a wooded lot, Scott said.


Firefighters arrived shortly after and got the fire under control within about 30 minutes, Scott said.


Hobart called Crown Point, Merrillville, New Chicago and Lake Station for mutual aid because the area has no hydrants, he said. The other departments brought tankers with water.


No injuries were reported.



Copyright 2014 nwitimes.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


5 agencies respond to fire that damages vacant Hobart house - nwitimes.com

2014-07-23T23:15:00Z 2014-07-24T06:49:06Z 5 agencies respond to fire that damages vacant Hobart houseTimes Staff nwitimes.com



HOBART | A fire damaged an unoccupied home late Wednesday in Hobart.


The cause of the fire at the single-family home in the 1200 block of South Hobart Road remains under investigation, said Bob Scott, lead fire investigator and Hobart EMS director.


Firefighters responded to the house between 9:15 and 9:30 p.m. Neighbors reportedly told police they heard a boom and saw fire. Police arrived first and saw fire coming from the front of the house, which is tucked away on a wooded lot, Scott said.


Firefighters arrived shortly after and got the fire under control within about 30 minutes, Scott said.


Hobart called Crown Point, Merrillville, New Chicago and Lake Station for mutual aid because the area has no hydrants, he said. The other departments brought tankers with water.


No injuries were reported.



Copyright 2014 nwitimes.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


This entry was posted in :

Thursday, July 24, 2014

James Goodman, Staff writer 10:49 p.m. EDT July 24, 2014




9 LINKEDIN MORE

Students and alumni of Hobart and William Smith Colleges are urging changes in how allegations of sexual misconduct are handled in the aftermath of a recent New York Times story telling how the colleges mishandled a rape complaint by a student.


Hobart and William Smith officials have defended their response to a rape of an 18-year-old freshman that is alleged to have happened at the outset of last school year. The student, identified as Anna, reported that three football players sexually assaulted her at a fraternity party. A disciplinary panel at the Geneva-based colleges cleared the students of wrongdoing. No criminal charges were filed.


But Hobart and William Smith officials, while disputing the Times' interpretation of events and portrayal of the colleges, say that changes are forthcoming.


"There will be changes in policies and procedures for adjudication of allegations of sexual misconduct. They will be in place before the fall semester," said Robert Flowers, vice president for student affairs at Hobart and William Smith and the official who reviewed the panel's finding that cleared the three students.


The Coalition of Concerned Students had 3,971 signatures Thursday on an online petition that says they are "horrified by the New York Times article exposing the administration's mismanagement of a campus sexual assault case."


Among the changes called for by the coalition is the appointment of "qualified individuals" to serve on the adjudication panel that reviews allegations of sexual assault.


Other changes sought include requiring the mandated rape prevention and student life seminars to focus on bystander intervention in such cases.


Another group, HWS Community for Change, was started by alumni of Hobart and William Smith. Its Facebook page, William Smith Stands with Anna, features five recommendations for Hobart and William Smith President Mark Gearan.


One of the recommendation is to "create transparency for and inclusion of stakeholders (students, faculty and alumni) in the review committee being assembled" to look at possible changes in procedures and policies.


Gretchen Sword, who is a 2006 Hobart and William Smith graduate and spokeswoman for Community for Change, said that her group and the students' group are collaborating.


"We are not only working together; we have a longer document that has been submitted to the leadership of the colleges," Sword said.


A meeting with representatives of both groups and the administration of Hobart and William Smith, Sword noted, is expected next week or the week after. It will not be open to the media.


"We would like to have a conversation that helps us understand what happened and how to move forward," she said.


David Grome, who is a 2007 Hobart and William Smith graduate, participated in the conference call that led to the Community for Change's recommendations.


"For me, it goes beyond the administration to the community. We all have to accept responsibility as members of the college's community to stay engaged in this," said Grome, 29, of Rochester.


In a July 16 letter to the Hobart and William Smith community, Gearan told of a group of faculty, staff, students and alumni working on a review of the colleges' processes for handling sexual misconduct cases.


"They will submit recommendations to me this summer," Gearan said.


Hobart and William Smith's prevention and education curriculum on issues related to sexual misconduct will be expanded.


Additional training will be provided for those involved with the response, investigation and adjudication of sexual misconduct complaints, Gearan noted.


As it is, lawyers not on the staff of Hobart and William Smith have been investigating sexual misconduct allegations since last fall, Flowers said.


The national spotlight has focused on Hobart and William Smith at a time sexual misconduct on campuses is coming under greater scrutiny.


On Thursday, Ohio State University fired the director of its marching band, Jonathan Waters, as it is expanding an internal investigation that found a deep culture of sexual harassment among students, reported The Columbus Dispatch.


The ouster of Waters came after a two-month probe, triggered by a complaint by a parent, that revealed extensive evidence that students routinely harassed one another — with new band members often targeted — and that Waters was aware or should have known about the abuse.


A new report released by Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., found that many of America's colleges and universities are failing to comply with federal laws and key policies designed to combat sexual assault on their campuses.


Her office polled 350 institutions of higher education and found major gaps in how schools report, investigate and resolve allegations of rape on college campuses.


Among the findings:


• Universities don't know the scope of the problem. Only 16 percent of schools conduct so-called climate surveys aimed at determining the prevalence of sexual assault on campus.


• Many schools do not make it easy for victims to report attacks anonymously. Only about half of U.S. colleges have a hotline that victims can call to report a sexual assault.


• Sexual assault charges often are not investigated. More than 40 percent of schools said they had not conducted a single sexual assault investigation in the past five years, even though some of those same institutions reported sexual violence incidents to the U.S. Department of Education in that same period.


• Many schools do not provide training to faculty, staff or students. About 20 percent of universities said they don't provide training to faculty and staff for how to respond to a sexual assault allegation.


"These problems affect nearly every stage of the institutions' response to sexual violence," the report concludes. "Many institutions are failing to comply with the law and best practices in how they handle sexual violence among students."


JGOODMAN@Democratand Chronicle.com


http://ift.tt/1vmdLIW


Includes reporting by Deirdre Shesgreen of the Gannett Washington bureau.


9 LINKEDIN MORE

Read or Share this story: http://on.rocne.ws/1mJlr06



Hobart and William Smith Colleges to change policies on sex misconduct cases - Rochester Democrat and Chronicle

James Goodman, Staff writer 10:49 p.m. EDT July 24, 2014




9 LINKEDIN MORE

Students and alumni of Hobart and William Smith Colleges are urging changes in how allegations of sexual misconduct are handled in the aftermath of a recent New York Times story telling how the colleges mishandled a rape complaint by a student.


Hobart and William Smith officials have defended their response to a rape of an 18-year-old freshman that is alleged to have happened at the outset of last school year. The student, identified as Anna, reported that three football players sexually assaulted her at a fraternity party. A disciplinary panel at the Geneva-based colleges cleared the students of wrongdoing. No criminal charges were filed.


But Hobart and William Smith officials, while disputing the Times' interpretation of events and portrayal of the colleges, say that changes are forthcoming.


"There will be changes in policies and procedures for adjudication of allegations of sexual misconduct. They will be in place before the fall semester," said Robert Flowers, vice president for student affairs at Hobart and William Smith and the official who reviewed the panel's finding that cleared the three students.


The Coalition of Concerned Students had 3,971 signatures Thursday on an online petition that says they are "horrified by the New York Times article exposing the administration's mismanagement of a campus sexual assault case."


Among the changes called for by the coalition is the appointment of "qualified individuals" to serve on the adjudication panel that reviews allegations of sexual assault.


Other changes sought include requiring the mandated rape prevention and student life seminars to focus on bystander intervention in such cases.


Another group, HWS Community for Change, was started by alumni of Hobart and William Smith. Its Facebook page, William Smith Stands with Anna, features five recommendations for Hobart and William Smith President Mark Gearan.


One of the recommendation is to "create transparency for and inclusion of stakeholders (students, faculty and alumni) in the review committee being assembled" to look at possible changes in procedures and policies.


Gretchen Sword, who is a 2006 Hobart and William Smith graduate and spokeswoman for Community for Change, said that her group and the students' group are collaborating.


"We are not only working together; we have a longer document that has been submitted to the leadership of the colleges," Sword said.


A meeting with representatives of both groups and the administration of Hobart and William Smith, Sword noted, is expected next week or the week after. It will not be open to the media.


"We would like to have a conversation that helps us understand what happened and how to move forward," she said.


David Grome, who is a 2007 Hobart and William Smith graduate, participated in the conference call that led to the Community for Change's recommendations.


"For me, it goes beyond the administration to the community. We all have to accept responsibility as members of the college's community to stay engaged in this," said Grome, 29, of Rochester.


In a July 16 letter to the Hobart and William Smith community, Gearan told of a group of faculty, staff, students and alumni working on a review of the colleges' processes for handling sexual misconduct cases.


"They will submit recommendations to me this summer," Gearan said.


Hobart and William Smith's prevention and education curriculum on issues related to sexual misconduct will be expanded.


Additional training will be provided for those involved with the response, investigation and adjudication of sexual misconduct complaints, Gearan noted.


As it is, lawyers not on the staff of Hobart and William Smith have been investigating sexual misconduct allegations since last fall, Flowers said.


The national spotlight has focused on Hobart and William Smith at a time sexual misconduct on campuses is coming under greater scrutiny.


On Thursday, Ohio State University fired the director of its marching band, Jonathan Waters, as it is expanding an internal investigation that found a deep culture of sexual harassment among students, reported The Columbus Dispatch.


The ouster of Waters came after a two-month probe, triggered by a complaint by a parent, that revealed extensive evidence that students routinely harassed one another — with new band members often targeted — and that Waters was aware or should have known about the abuse.


A new report released by Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., found that many of America's colleges and universities are failing to comply with federal laws and key policies designed to combat sexual assault on their campuses.


Her office polled 350 institutions of higher education and found major gaps in how schools report, investigate and resolve allegations of rape on college campuses.


Among the findings:


• Universities don't know the scope of the problem. Only 16 percent of schools conduct so-called climate surveys aimed at determining the prevalence of sexual assault on campus.


• Many schools do not make it easy for victims to report attacks anonymously. Only about half of U.S. colleges have a hotline that victims can call to report a sexual assault.


• Sexual assault charges often are not investigated. More than 40 percent of schools said they had not conducted a single sexual assault investigation in the past five years, even though some of those same institutions reported sexual violence incidents to the U.S. Department of Education in that same period.


• Many schools do not provide training to faculty, staff or students. About 20 percent of universities said they don't provide training to faculty and staff for how to respond to a sexual assault allegation.


"These problems affect nearly every stage of the institutions' response to sexual violence," the report concludes. "Many institutions are failing to comply with the law and best practices in how they handle sexual violence among students."


JGOODMAN@Democratand Chronicle.com


http://ift.tt/1vmdLIW


Includes reporting by Deirdre Shesgreen of the Gannett Washington bureau.


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Laine Kasardowner All Souped Up cooks burgers two grills thlook like souped up car engines Thursday Hobart's Summer Market Lake.

Laine Kasarda, owner of All Souped Up, cooks burgers on two grills that look like souped up car engines Thursday at Hobart's Summer Market on the Lake. | Karen Caffarini/for Sun-Times Media



storyidforme: 69530990

tmspicid: 24648288

fileheaderid: 12321379




If you go


WHAT: Friends of Robinson Lake Rummage Sale


WHEN: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday; 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday


WHERE: St. Bridget Catholic Church gym, 568 E. 2nd St., Hobart


WHAT: Proceeds to benefit Robinson Lake Park in Hobart




Updated: July 24, 2014 11:14PM


HOBART — Bargains, beets and burgers with a twist were among the offerings Thursday at two events that drew crowds to the downtown area.


At St. Bridget Catholic Church gym, bargain hunters scoured through tables of toys, books, old records and more at an annual rummage sale sponsored by Friends of Robinson Lake.


A few minutes away, the city of Hobart’s Summer Market on the Lake was underway at Festival Park, with vendors offering fresh produce, meals, snacks, jewelry and other items.


“It’s a pleasant day, a great outing for the family,” said Connie Wells, of Hobart, who just finished eating a meal with several family members.


Among the foods offered by Alison Eichorn, owner of Early Bird Vegan and Vegetarian Food Truck, were an Italian sausage made of mashed beans with wheat gluten and spices and a burger made of soy and vegetable proteins.


“Ninety-nine percent of my customers are vegetarians. They try it and like it,” Eichorn said.


At All Souped Up, the burgers are made of meat and cooked on two grills that resemble a souped-up car engine. Owner Laine Kasarda said she didn’t get the name of her business from the replica grill but from her dad.


“His claim to fame was soup. Once a month, he would make a big batch of soup and would call all seven of his kids and tell them to come and get it,” Kasarda said.


Julie Mandon, with the Hobart Parks Department, said there are several new vendors this year and more activities for kids. Mandon said now that local farmers are beginning to harvest their vegetables, more produce will be offered at future markets. The market is held every Thursday in the summer.


At the rummage sale, Friends member Zeta Allen said all proceeds from the sale, which continues Friday and Saturday, go toward the improvement of Robinson Lake Park in cooperation with the Hobart Parks Department. She said the nonprofit group recently donated a $2,500 check to the parks department from last year’s sale. Another $1,000 was donated to improve restrooms at the park.






Double dose of fun in Hobart - Post-Tribune





Laine Kasardowner All Souped Up cooks burgers two grills thlook like souped up car engines Thursday Hobart's Summer Market Lake.

Laine Kasarda, owner of All Souped Up, cooks burgers on two grills that look like souped up car engines Thursday at Hobart's Summer Market on the Lake. | Karen Caffarini/for Sun-Times Media



storyidforme: 69530990

tmspicid: 24648288

fileheaderid: 12321379




If you go


WHAT: Friends of Robinson Lake Rummage Sale


WHEN: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday; 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday


WHERE: St. Bridget Catholic Church gym, 568 E. 2nd St., Hobart


WHAT: Proceeds to benefit Robinson Lake Park in Hobart




Updated: July 24, 2014 11:14PM


HOBART — Bargains, beets and burgers with a twist were among the offerings Thursday at two events that drew crowds to the downtown area.


At St. Bridget Catholic Church gym, bargain hunters scoured through tables of toys, books, old records and more at an annual rummage sale sponsored by Friends of Robinson Lake.


A few minutes away, the city of Hobart’s Summer Market on the Lake was underway at Festival Park, with vendors offering fresh produce, meals, snacks, jewelry and other items.


“It’s a pleasant day, a great outing for the family,” said Connie Wells, of Hobart, who just finished eating a meal with several family members.


Among the foods offered by Alison Eichorn, owner of Early Bird Vegan and Vegetarian Food Truck, were an Italian sausage made of mashed beans with wheat gluten and spices and a burger made of soy and vegetable proteins.


“Ninety-nine percent of my customers are vegetarians. They try it and like it,” Eichorn said.


At All Souped Up, the burgers are made of meat and cooked on two grills that resemble a souped-up car engine. Owner Laine Kasarda said she didn’t get the name of her business from the replica grill but from her dad.


“His claim to fame was soup. Once a month, he would make a big batch of soup and would call all seven of his kids and tell them to come and get it,” Kasarda said.


Julie Mandon, with the Hobart Parks Department, said there are several new vendors this year and more activities for kids. Mandon said now that local farmers are beginning to harvest their vegetables, more produce will be offered at future markets. The market is held every Thursday in the summer.


At the rummage sale, Friends member Zeta Allen said all proceeds from the sale, which continues Friday and Saturday, go toward the improvement of Robinson Lake Park in cooperation with the Hobart Parks Department. She said the nonprofit group recently donated a $2,500 check to the parks department from last year’s sale. Another $1,000 was donated to improve restrooms at the park.






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The white line shows one few parking spaces front Brickie Gyros 3rd Street Hobart. The owner is seeking more parking

The white line shows one of a few parking spaces in front of Brickie Gyros on 3rd Street in Hobart. The owner is seeking more parking spaces. | Karen Caffarini~for Sun-Times Media



storyidforme: 69264148

tmspicid: 24568984

fileheaderid: 12269953


Updated: July 23, 2014 10:52PM


HOBART — City staff is looking for a way to solve a business owner’s need for more parking spaces without making the traffic situation near the East Third Street bridge any more precarious.


Lana Wuest, owner of Brickies Gyros at 431 E. Third St., asked the Board of Public Works and Safety to allow additional parking spaces close to her business. She said there are no parking spaces west of her business.


“I’m losing spaces instead of gaining them,” she told the board.


Mayor Brian Snedecor said the best place to add parking might be by the bridge, where yellow curbing is marked.


Police Chief Richard Zormier said traffic flow in the area just off Main Street is precarious already.


“Additional parking on the bridge wouldn’t work. Parking on the west side could still cause difficulty,” Zormier said.


Complaints of speeding traffic in that area by a neighboring business owner resulted in the loss of one parking space earlier this summer as part of a solution.


To slow down motorists, the city painted striping on the street near the clocktower to indicate a pedestrian crosswalk and placed a pylon on each side of the crosswalk as a temporary fix.


City Engineer Phil Gralik said it was the best he could do for the time being. He said a better solution would be made along with Americans With Disabilities-accessible ramps and curbs, when the city does the downtown streetscape plan.


At the time, Gralik said he wanted to keep the parking along 3rd Street because he believes it has a calming effect on traffic.


He told the Board of Works he would look into Wuest’s situation and see what the travel lane width would be with additional parking.


In other matters, resident Robert Erickson was told he would have to go to the plan commission along with other residents in the area to have the unimproved section of Illinois Street near his house vacated if he wants to install a fence on his property there.


“I don’t se any value in putting Illinois Street through there. It might be time to visit it in its entirety with all the homeowners involved,” Board of Works member Thomas Ehrhardt said.


City Planner Sergio Mendoza said if the street is vacated, it needs to be the whole street, not just the portion abutting Erickson’s home in the 300 block of Linda Street.


Mendoza said all the property owners need to have a say on whether the street’s vacated because the property would go back to the homeowners, who would in turn have to pay taxes on their new additional land.


Erickson wanted permission to erect a fence, saying he would remove it if the city needs access to the easement, or install four gates that would provide easy access to city vehicles. He also suggested installing a bridge.






Hobart eyes solutions for business parking - Post-Tribune





The white line shows one few parking spaces front Brickie Gyros 3rd Street Hobart. The owner is seeking more parking

The white line shows one of a few parking spaces in front of Brickie Gyros on 3rd Street in Hobart. The owner is seeking more parking spaces. | Karen Caffarini~for Sun-Times Media



storyidforme: 69264148

tmspicid: 24568984

fileheaderid: 12269953


Updated: July 23, 2014 10:52PM


HOBART — City staff is looking for a way to solve a business owner’s need for more parking spaces without making the traffic situation near the East Third Street bridge any more precarious.


Lana Wuest, owner of Brickies Gyros at 431 E. Third St., asked the Board of Public Works and Safety to allow additional parking spaces close to her business. She said there are no parking spaces west of her business.


“I’m losing spaces instead of gaining them,” she told the board.


Mayor Brian Snedecor said the best place to add parking might be by the bridge, where yellow curbing is marked.


Police Chief Richard Zormier said traffic flow in the area just off Main Street is precarious already.


“Additional parking on the bridge wouldn’t work. Parking on the west side could still cause difficulty,” Zormier said.


Complaints of speeding traffic in that area by a neighboring business owner resulted in the loss of one parking space earlier this summer as part of a solution.


To slow down motorists, the city painted striping on the street near the clocktower to indicate a pedestrian crosswalk and placed a pylon on each side of the crosswalk as a temporary fix.


City Engineer Phil Gralik said it was the best he could do for the time being. He said a better solution would be made along with Americans With Disabilities-accessible ramps and curbs, when the city does the downtown streetscape plan.


At the time, Gralik said he wanted to keep the parking along 3rd Street because he believes it has a calming effect on traffic.


He told the Board of Works he would look into Wuest’s situation and see what the travel lane width would be with additional parking.


In other matters, resident Robert Erickson was told he would have to go to the plan commission along with other residents in the area to have the unimproved section of Illinois Street near his house vacated if he wants to install a fence on his property there.


“I don’t se any value in putting Illinois Street through there. It might be time to visit it in its entirety with all the homeowners involved,” Board of Works member Thomas Ehrhardt said.


City Planner Sergio Mendoza said if the street is vacated, it needs to be the whole street, not just the portion abutting Erickson’s home in the 300 block of Linda Street.


Mendoza said all the property owners need to have a say on whether the street’s vacated because the property would go back to the homeowners, who would in turn have to pay taxes on their new additional land.


Erickson wanted permission to erect a fence, saying he would remove it if the city needs access to the easement, or install four gates that would provide easy access to city vehicles. He also suggested installing a bridge.






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