Friday, October 31, 2014


GENEVA — The Hobart hockey team finished last season with a 14-9-4 record and reached the ECAC West conference semifinals.


Head coach Mark Taylor and the Statesmen want more. That starts with erasing weekend lapses.


“Basically, the mindset is that we want to do a lot more than we did last year,” Taylor said. “We had a couple weekends that we really weren’t happy with. For us, I’m looking at that we need to make sure as individuals that we’re putting down a pretty darn good performance each night as a team.


“Consistency, not having any lull weekends — I think we’ve had a pretty good track record of not having a bad weekend — we want to get rid of those,” Taylor continued. “They haven’t been a trademark of ours. Play to our full potential every night — that’s really where we’re at.”


Taylor hopes his team’s offensive depth will alleviate those pitfall weekends.


Hobart returns its top five scorers in junior forwards Mac Olson (27 points), Ben Gamache (25) and Bo Webster (23), senior defenseman Ryan Michel (19) and sophomore defenseman Carl Belizario (16).


“Bo Webster, Ben Gamache and Mac Olson, those three guys are key to us for sure,” Taylor remarked. “I look at the three seniors of Tommaso Traversa, Brad McBride and Robert Sovik, there is a nice depth there.


“I look and say that we have four lines every night that we’re pretty proud of, but those four lines have to play to their full potential. There are some excellent players in that group, and there is not one player on any team in this league that is going to carry the offense. I think our guys know that. We have some guys that are more touted than others, but I think it’s going to be our strength as a group.”


In goal, Taylor looks for more stout performances from junior Lino Chimienti. He posted a 13-6-3 record with a 2.58 goals-against average, a .912 save percentage and one shutout last season.


“Goaltending is a job from game to game. That’s the nature of the beast and beauty of the job,” Taylor commented. “If you’re playing good, you get to keep it. We need Lino to put down a lot more stellar games than he has put down. We just need consistently high play out of him. He has definitely shown that he can play very special. As a goaltender, you want to keep adding more special nights every year.


“To have a good program, you need to have more than one guy and we have some other guys in house. Those guys are here to battle for goaltending time. Whichever guy is in the lead, wants to try and stay in the lead.”


The Statesmen also feature junior goalie Tim Keegan, who was 1-3-1 with a 3.16 goals-against average and a .894 save percentage last year. Sophomore Gryphon Richardson will try to earn some time between the pipes.


As for the newcomers, Taylor is hoping for impact performances, but will let the players do the talking with their play.


“I think there are some freshman that are going to factor in,” Taylor noted. “For me, I always look at that as a curse. We had some freshman, all-stars last year, but I wasn’t touting them. My feeling is let the freshman guys make their own noise.”


For the Statesmen to achieve success in 2014-15, Taylor believes it will take a conscious effort by his players to translate individual preparation into the team concept.


“It’s guys getting themselves to the right place mentally and physically so that they can perform up to their individual capabilities, and then do it within the framework and purpose of the team,” Taylor said. “And, you need a little luck.


“Make sure team is first and get after it. Hopefully, the wins take care of themselves.”



HOBART HOCKEY 2014-15 PREVIEW: Searching for consistency - Finger Lakes Times


GENEVA — The Hobart hockey team finished last season with a 14-9-4 record and reached the ECAC West conference semifinals.


Head coach Mark Taylor and the Statesmen want more. That starts with erasing weekend lapses.


“Basically, the mindset is that we want to do a lot more than we did last year,” Taylor said. “We had a couple weekends that we really weren’t happy with. For us, I’m looking at that we need to make sure as individuals that we’re putting down a pretty darn good performance each night as a team.


“Consistency, not having any lull weekends — I think we’ve had a pretty good track record of not having a bad weekend — we want to get rid of those,” Taylor continued. “They haven’t been a trademark of ours. Play to our full potential every night — that’s really where we’re at.”


Taylor hopes his team’s offensive depth will alleviate those pitfall weekends.


Hobart returns its top five scorers in junior forwards Mac Olson (27 points), Ben Gamache (25) and Bo Webster (23), senior defenseman Ryan Michel (19) and sophomore defenseman Carl Belizario (16).


“Bo Webster, Ben Gamache and Mac Olson, those three guys are key to us for sure,” Taylor remarked. “I look at the three seniors of Tommaso Traversa, Brad McBride and Robert Sovik, there is a nice depth there.


“I look and say that we have four lines every night that we’re pretty proud of, but those four lines have to play to their full potential. There are some excellent players in that group, and there is not one player on any team in this league that is going to carry the offense. I think our guys know that. We have some guys that are more touted than others, but I think it’s going to be our strength as a group.”


In goal, Taylor looks for more stout performances from junior Lino Chimienti. He posted a 13-6-3 record with a 2.58 goals-against average, a .912 save percentage and one shutout last season.


“Goaltending is a job from game to game. That’s the nature of the beast and beauty of the job,” Taylor commented. “If you’re playing good, you get to keep it. We need Lino to put down a lot more stellar games than he has put down. We just need consistently high play out of him. He has definitely shown that he can play very special. As a goaltender, you want to keep adding more special nights every year.


“To have a good program, you need to have more than one guy and we have some other guys in house. Those guys are here to battle for goaltending time. Whichever guy is in the lead, wants to try and stay in the lead.”


The Statesmen also feature junior goalie Tim Keegan, who was 1-3-1 with a 3.16 goals-against average and a .894 save percentage last year. Sophomore Gryphon Richardson will try to earn some time between the pipes.


As for the newcomers, Taylor is hoping for impact performances, but will let the players do the talking with their play.


“I think there are some freshman that are going to factor in,” Taylor noted. “For me, I always look at that as a curse. We had some freshman, all-stars last year, but I wasn’t touting them. My feeling is let the freshman guys make their own noise.”


For the Statesmen to achieve success in 2014-15, Taylor believes it will take a conscious effort by his players to translate individual preparation into the team concept.


“It’s guys getting themselves to the right place mentally and physically so that they can perform up to their individual capabilities, and then do it within the framework and purpose of the team,” Taylor said. “And, you need a little luck.


“Make sure team is first and get after it. Hopefully, the wins take care of themselves.”



This entry was posted in :

HOBART | The Hobart Commercial Historic District is one step closer to being recognized on the National Register of Historic Places.


In mid-October, the Indiana Historic Preservation Review Board recommended nominating the district for the status, and the nomination could be approved on the national level in the coming months.


The proposed Hobart Commercial Historic District is roughly bounded by Lake George, the Norfolk Southern Railroad, Center Street and Second Street.


“Being on the registry is a big deal,” said Sergio Mendoza, Hobart’s city planner. “It’s good for the city, and it is a nice thing for Northwest Indiana to have another location on the national registry.”


If approved, the district would join other communities with nationally recognized historic downtowns, including the Crown Point Courthouse Square, downtown Valparaiso, Chesterton Downtown Historic District and Hammond Hohman Avenue and State Street, said Tiffany Tolbert, director of Indiana Landmarks Northwest field office.


The city of Hobart bestowed a local historical designation a few years ago, and the request for national designation was made by the Hobart Redevelopment Commission with the help of Indiana Landmarks‘ Partners in Preservation National Register program.


Tolbert said the listing on the national registry is an honorary designation, but offers incentives including federal rehabilitation tax credits for commercially used buildings and historic preservation grant funding.


“By achieving the designation, the city will be in a position to utilize these incentives, when appropriate,” she said, adding it will help with downtown revitalization efforts.


The city is creating a new, 10-year comprehensive plan, which will be released next year and will run through 2025. Mendoza said the comprehensive plan will have a chapter dedicated to historic preservation.


“We want to have guidelines on how to preserve the area and explore any opportunities that are out there,” he said.



Downtown Hobart close to national historic designation - nwitimes.com


HOBART | The Hobart Commercial Historic District is one step closer to being recognized on the National Register of Historic Places.


In mid-October, the Indiana Historic Preservation Review Board recommended nominating the district for the status, and the nomination could be approved on the national level in the coming months.


The proposed Hobart Commercial Historic District is roughly bounded by Lake George, the Norfolk Southern Railroad, Center Street and Second Street.


“Being on the registry is a big deal,” said Sergio Mendoza, Hobart’s city planner. “It’s good for the city, and it is a nice thing for Northwest Indiana to have another location on the national registry.”


If approved, the district would join other communities with nationally recognized historic downtowns, including the Crown Point Courthouse Square, downtown Valparaiso, Chesterton Downtown Historic District and Hammond Hohman Avenue and State Street, said Tiffany Tolbert, director of Indiana Landmarks Northwest field office.


The city of Hobart bestowed a local historical designation a few years ago, and the request for national designation was made by the Hobart Redevelopment Commission with the help of Indiana Landmarks‘ Partners in Preservation National Register program.


Tolbert said the listing on the national registry is an honorary designation, but offers incentives including federal rehabilitation tax credits for commercially used buildings and historic preservation grant funding.


“By achieving the designation, the city will be in a position to utilize these incentives, when appropriate,” she said, adding it will help with downtown revitalization efforts.


The city is creating a new, 10-year comprehensive plan, which will be released next year and will run through 2025. Mendoza said the comprehensive plan will have a chapter dedicated to historic preservation.


“We want to have guidelines on how to preserve the area and explore any opportunities that are out there,” he said.



This entry was posted in :




Hobart Mayor Brian Snedecor right swears Brian Kerr as new chief Hobart Fire Department Statizone Tuesday. | Karen Caffarini/for Sun-Times

Hobart Mayor Brian Snedecor, right, swears in Brian Kerr as the new chief of the Hobart Fire Department in Station zone on Tuesday. | Karen Caffarini/for Sun-Times Media ORG XMIT: 51MMpDc3JyefwHAbRl2j



storyidforme: 73828100

tmspicid: 25825717

fileheaderid: 13223519


Updated: October 29, 2014 2:04AM


HOBART--Interim Fire Chief Brian Kerr moved into the top position on a permanent basis Tuesday.


Kerr, 43, was sworn into office by Mayor Brian Snedecor as family members, city officials, members of the fire department and former Chief Stephen McKown looked on.


He’ll lead a department of 52 firefighters.


Snedecor said in the two months that they worked together as chief and assistant chief, McKown and Kerr formed a good team with good vision for the department.


“For some of Brian’s goals and vision, I commend him. He’s had a chance to look where there could be improvements, such as in training and equipment,” Snedecor said.


Snedecor said Kerr is invested in both the fire community and the community as a whole, pointing out that Kerr is involved in local sports and represents the department at various events.


Kerr said he wants work to be as safe as possible for the firefighters.


“With the support of the mayor and the council, I can see the department moving forward,” Kerr said.


Kerr has been with the fire department for about 18 years and was a member of the streets and sanitation department for 4 1/2 years before that.


He was named assistant chief by former Fire Chief Brian Taylor in January 2013 and became interim chief in July 2013 after Taylor resigned.


He resigned from the top post a few months later, only to return to the post after McKown resigned a couple weeks ago.


Kerr grew up in Hobart and was a 1988 graduate of Hobart High School where he was a member of the Brickies football team. His father, Keith Kerr, was assistant fire chief with the department beginning in 1996, the same year Brian Kerr started with the department. Kerr and his wife, Suzann Kerr, have two children.






Veteran Hobart firefighter becomes chief - Post-Tribune





Hobart Mayor Brian Snedecor right swears Brian Kerr as new chief Hobart Fire Department Statizone Tuesday. | Karen Caffarini/for Sun-Times

Hobart Mayor Brian Snedecor, right, swears in Brian Kerr as the new chief of the Hobart Fire Department in Station zone on Tuesday. | Karen Caffarini/for Sun-Times Media ORG XMIT: 51MMpDc3JyefwHAbRl2j



storyidforme: 73828100

tmspicid: 25825717

fileheaderid: 13223519


Updated: October 29, 2014 2:04AM


HOBART--Interim Fire Chief Brian Kerr moved into the top position on a permanent basis Tuesday.


Kerr, 43, was sworn into office by Mayor Brian Snedecor as family members, city officials, members of the fire department and former Chief Stephen McKown looked on.


He’ll lead a department of 52 firefighters.


Snedecor said in the two months that they worked together as chief and assistant chief, McKown and Kerr formed a good team with good vision for the department.


“For some of Brian’s goals and vision, I commend him. He’s had a chance to look where there could be improvements, such as in training and equipment,” Snedecor said.


Snedecor said Kerr is invested in both the fire community and the community as a whole, pointing out that Kerr is involved in local sports and represents the department at various events.


Kerr said he wants work to be as safe as possible for the firefighters.


“With the support of the mayor and the council, I can see the department moving forward,” Kerr said.


Kerr has been with the fire department for about 18 years and was a member of the streets and sanitation department for 4 1/2 years before that.


He was named assistant chief by former Fire Chief Brian Taylor in January 2013 and became interim chief in July 2013 after Taylor resigned.


He resigned from the top post a few months later, only to return to the post after McKown resigned a couple weeks ago.


Kerr grew up in Hobart and was a 1988 graduate of Hobart High School where he was a member of the Brickies football team. His father, Keith Kerr, was assistant fire chief with the department beginning in 1996, the same year Brian Kerr started with the department. Kerr and his wife, Suzann Kerr, have two children.






This entry was posted in :

HOBART | The Hobart Commercial Historic District is one step closer to being recognized on the National Register of Historic Places.


In mid-October, the Indiana Historic Preservation Review Board recommended nominating the district for the status, and the nomination could be approved on the national level in the coming months.


The proposed Hobart Commercial Historic District is roughly bounded by Lake George, the Norfolk Southern Railroad, Center Street and Second Street.


“Being on the registry is a big deal,” said Sergio Mendoza, Hobart’s city planner. “It’s good for the city, and it is a nice thing for Northwest Indiana to have another location on the national registry.”


If approved, the district would join other communities with nationally recognized historic downtowns, including the Crown Point Courthouse Square, downtown Valparaiso, Chesterton Downtown Historic District and Hammond Hohman Avenue and State Street, said Tiffany Tolbert, director of Indiana Landmarks Northwest field office.


The city of Hobart bestowed a local historical designation a few years ago, and the request for national designation was made by the Hobart Redevelopment Commission with the help of Indiana Landmarks‘ Partners in Preservation National Register program.


Tolbert said the listing on the national registry is an honorary designation, but offers incentives including federal rehabilitation tax credits for commercially used buildings and historic preservation grant funding.


“By achieving the designation, the city will be in a position to utilize these incentives, when appropriate,” she said, adding it will help with downtown revitalization efforts.


The city is creating a new, 10-year comprehensive plan, which will be released next year and will run through 2025. Mendoza said the comprehensive plan will have a chapter dedicated to historic preservation.


“We want to have guidelines on how to preserve the area and explore any opportunities that are out there,” he said.



Downtown Hobart close to national historic designation - nwitimes.com


HOBART | The Hobart Commercial Historic District is one step closer to being recognized on the National Register of Historic Places.


In mid-October, the Indiana Historic Preservation Review Board recommended nominating the district for the status, and the nomination could be approved on the national level in the coming months.


The proposed Hobart Commercial Historic District is roughly bounded by Lake George, the Norfolk Southern Railroad, Center Street and Second Street.


“Being on the registry is a big deal,” said Sergio Mendoza, Hobart’s city planner. “It’s good for the city, and it is a nice thing for Northwest Indiana to have another location on the national registry.”


If approved, the district would join other communities with nationally recognized historic downtowns, including the Crown Point Courthouse Square, downtown Valparaiso, Chesterton Downtown Historic District and Hammond Hohman Avenue and State Street, said Tiffany Tolbert, director of Indiana Landmarks Northwest field office.


The city of Hobart bestowed a local historical designation a few years ago, and the request for national designation was made by the Hobart Redevelopment Commission with the help of Indiana Landmarks‘ Partners in Preservation National Register program.


Tolbert said the listing on the national registry is an honorary designation, but offers incentives including federal rehabilitation tax credits for commercially used buildings and historic preservation grant funding.


“By achieving the designation, the city will be in a position to utilize these incentives, when appropriate,” she said, adding it will help with downtown revitalization efforts.


The city is creating a new, 10-year comprehensive plan, which will be released next year and will run through 2025. Mendoza said the comprehensive plan will have a chapter dedicated to historic preservation.


“We want to have guidelines on how to preserve the area and explore any opportunities that are out there,” he said.



This entry was posted in :




Hobart Mayor Brian Snedecor right swears Brian Kerr as new chief Hobart Fire Department Statizone Tuesday. | Karen Caffarini/for Sun-Times

Hobart Mayor Brian Snedecor, right, swears in Brian Kerr as the new chief of the Hobart Fire Department in Station zone on Tuesday. | Karen Caffarini/for Sun-Times Media ORG XMIT: 51MMpDc3JyefwHAbRl2j



storyidforme: 73828100

tmspicid: 25825717

fileheaderid: 13223519


Updated: October 29, 2014 2:04AM


HOBART--Interim Fire Chief Brian Kerr moved into the top position on a permanent basis Tuesday.


Kerr, 43, was sworn into office by Mayor Brian Snedecor as family members, city officials, members of the fire department and former Chief Stephen McKown looked on.


He’ll lead a department of 52 firefighters.


Snedecor said in the two months that they worked together as chief and assistant chief, McKown and Kerr formed a good team with good vision for the department.


“For some of Brian’s goals and vision, I commend him. He’s had a chance to look where there could be improvements, such as in training and equipment,” Snedecor said.


Snedecor said Kerr is invested in both the fire community and the community as a whole, pointing out that Kerr is involved in local sports and represents the department at various events.


Kerr said he wants work to be as safe as possible for the firefighters.


“With the support of the mayor and the council, I can see the department moving forward,” Kerr said.


Kerr has been with the fire department for about 18 years and was a member of the streets and sanitation department for 4 1/2 years before that.


He was named assistant chief by former Fire Chief Brian Taylor in January 2013 and became interim chief in July 2013 after Taylor resigned.


He resigned from the top post a few months later, only to return to the post after McKown resigned a couple weeks ago.


Kerr grew up in Hobart and was a 1988 graduate of Hobart High School where he was a member of the Brickies football team. His father, Keith Kerr, was assistant fire chief with the department beginning in 1996, the same year Brian Kerr started with the department. Kerr and his wife, Suzann Kerr, have two children.






Veteran Hobart firefighter becomes chief - Post-Tribune





Hobart Mayor Brian Snedecor right swears Brian Kerr as new chief Hobart Fire Department Statizone Tuesday. | Karen Caffarini/for Sun-Times

Hobart Mayor Brian Snedecor, right, swears in Brian Kerr as the new chief of the Hobart Fire Department in Station zone on Tuesday. | Karen Caffarini/for Sun-Times Media ORG XMIT: 51MMpDc3JyefwHAbRl2j



storyidforme: 73828100

tmspicid: 25825717

fileheaderid: 13223519


Updated: October 29, 2014 2:04AM


HOBART--Interim Fire Chief Brian Kerr moved into the top position on a permanent basis Tuesday.


Kerr, 43, was sworn into office by Mayor Brian Snedecor as family members, city officials, members of the fire department and former Chief Stephen McKown looked on.


He’ll lead a department of 52 firefighters.


Snedecor said in the two months that they worked together as chief and assistant chief, McKown and Kerr formed a good team with good vision for the department.


“For some of Brian’s goals and vision, I commend him. He’s had a chance to look where there could be improvements, such as in training and equipment,” Snedecor said.


Snedecor said Kerr is invested in both the fire community and the community as a whole, pointing out that Kerr is involved in local sports and represents the department at various events.


Kerr said he wants work to be as safe as possible for the firefighters.


“With the support of the mayor and the council, I can see the department moving forward,” Kerr said.


Kerr has been with the fire department for about 18 years and was a member of the streets and sanitation department for 4 1/2 years before that.


He was named assistant chief by former Fire Chief Brian Taylor in January 2013 and became interim chief in July 2013 after Taylor resigned.


He resigned from the top post a few months later, only to return to the post after McKown resigned a couple weeks ago.


Kerr grew up in Hobart and was a 1988 graduate of Hobart High School where he was a member of the Brickies football team. His father, Keith Kerr, was assistant fire chief with the department beginning in 1996, the same year Brian Kerr started with the department. Kerr and his wife, Suzann Kerr, have two children.






This entry was posted in :




Hobart Police used an ATV while Lake County Sheriffs used their helicopter search for suspect corn field off 61st Hobart

Hobart Police used an ATV while Lake County Sheriffs used their helicopter to search for a suspect in a corn field off of 61st in Hobart on October 26, 2014. | Jim Karczewski/For Sun-Times Media



storyidforme: 73745697

tmspicid: 25797760

fileheaderid: 13209032


Updated: October 27, 2014 9:37AM


HOBART — A man who allegedly tried to run over two police officers Sunday before driving into a corn field and touching off a manhunt could be charged Monday, Hobart Police Chief Rick Zormier said Sunday night.


The man tried to run over Detective Scott Shaginaw and Officer Chris Ciselski, who had been directing traffic about four miles away at County Line Orchard, 200 S. County Line Road, Zormier said.


The orchard, which features apple and pumpkin picking among other activities, is busy at this time of year. Police did not say what might have motivated the man to allegedly drive toward the officers.


After a short vehicle chase, the man drove his gold Acura into a corn field at about 61st Avenue and Deep River Road, police said. But it apparently got stuck near an irrigation system, and he had to abandoned it and flee on foot.


After an hourslong search that included police dogs and a helicopter, police thought the man might try to hide among the tall corn plants until dark, Zormier said. Police apprehended him as he walked out of the corn field on Colorado Street near 69th Avenue about 5:40 p.m. as the sun was setting, Zormier said.


Police withheld his identity, pending charges.


The car was towed out of the field.


Neighbors had been listening to a police scanner to follow the action.


“We saw a car drive down 61st at a high rate of speed,” said a neighbor who declined to give his name. “Then he drove to the sprinkler system and got his car stuck.”


Sally and Clarence Davis, who share the corn field with another family, weren’t home for most of the incident.


“I was at a confirmation. I didn’t even know until I looked at my phone and saw four messages,” Sally Davis said. “One of our farmers was very concerned that the field was torn up.”


Another neighbor said the corn “rained down all over the place” as the man drove through the field.


Until the man was caught, some were preparing for the worst.


“One of our neighbors has taken his wife and child (and) are sleeping somewhere else tonight,” Sally Davis said.


Contributing: Post-Tribune staff






Man allegedly tried to run down cops before driving into corn field - Post-Tribune





Hobart Police used an ATV while Lake County Sheriffs used their helicopter search for suspect corn field off 61st Hobart

Hobart Police used an ATV while Lake County Sheriffs used their helicopter to search for a suspect in a corn field off of 61st in Hobart on October 26, 2014. | Jim Karczewski/For Sun-Times Media



storyidforme: 73745697

tmspicid: 25797760

fileheaderid: 13209032


Updated: October 27, 2014 9:37AM


HOBART — A man who allegedly tried to run over two police officers Sunday before driving into a corn field and touching off a manhunt could be charged Monday, Hobart Police Chief Rick Zormier said Sunday night.


The man tried to run over Detective Scott Shaginaw and Officer Chris Ciselski, who had been directing traffic about four miles away at County Line Orchard, 200 S. County Line Road, Zormier said.


The orchard, which features apple and pumpkin picking among other activities, is busy at this time of year. Police did not say what might have motivated the man to allegedly drive toward the officers.


After a short vehicle chase, the man drove his gold Acura into a corn field at about 61st Avenue and Deep River Road, police said. But it apparently got stuck near an irrigation system, and he had to abandoned it and flee on foot.


After an hourslong search that included police dogs and a helicopter, police thought the man might try to hide among the tall corn plants until dark, Zormier said. Police apprehended him as he walked out of the corn field on Colorado Street near 69th Avenue about 5:40 p.m. as the sun was setting, Zormier said.


Police withheld his identity, pending charges.


The car was towed out of the field.


Neighbors had been listening to a police scanner to follow the action.


“We saw a car drive down 61st at a high rate of speed,” said a neighbor who declined to give his name. “Then he drove to the sprinkler system and got his car stuck.”


Sally and Clarence Davis, who share the corn field with another family, weren’t home for most of the incident.


“I was at a confirmation. I didn’t even know until I looked at my phone and saw four messages,” Sally Davis said. “One of our farmers was very concerned that the field was torn up.”


Another neighbor said the corn “rained down all over the place” as the man drove through the field.


Until the man was caught, some were preparing for the worst.


“One of our neighbors has taken his wife and child (and) are sleeping somewhere else tonight,” Sally Davis said.


Contributing: Post-Tribune staff






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HOBART | The Hobart Commercial Historic District is one step closer to being recognized on the National Register of Historic Places.


In mid-October, the Indiana Historic Preservation Review Board recommended nominating the district for the status, and the nomination could be approved on the national level in the coming months.


The proposed Hobart Commercial Historic District is roughly bounded by Lake George, the Norfolk Southern Railroad, Center Street and Second Street.


“Being on the registry is a big deal,” said Sergio Mendoza, Hobart’s city planner. “It’s good for the city, and it is a nice thing for Northwest Indiana to have another location on the national registry.”


If approved, the district would join other communities with nationally recognized historic downtowns, including the Crown Point Courthouse Square, downtown Valparaiso, Chesterton Downtown Historic District and Hammond Hohman Avenue and State Street, said Tiffany Tolbert, director of Indiana Landmarks Northwest field office.


The city of Hobart bestowed a local historical designation a few years ago, and the request for national designation was made by the Hobart Redevelopment Commission with the help of Indiana Landmarks‘ Partners in Preservation National Register program.


Tolbert said the listing on the national registry is an honorary designation, but offers incentives including federal rehabilitation tax credits for commercially used buildings and historic preservation grant funding.


“By achieving the designation, the city will be in a position to utilize these incentives, when appropriate,” she said, adding it will help with downtown revitalization efforts.


The city is creating a new, 10-year comprehensive plan, which will be released next year and will run through 2025. Mendoza said the comprehensive plan will have a chapter dedicated to historic preservation.


“We want to have guidelines on how to preserve the area and explore any opportunities that are out there,” he said.



Downtown Hobart close to national historic designation - nwitimes.com


HOBART | The Hobart Commercial Historic District is one step closer to being recognized on the National Register of Historic Places.


In mid-October, the Indiana Historic Preservation Review Board recommended nominating the district for the status, and the nomination could be approved on the national level in the coming months.


The proposed Hobart Commercial Historic District is roughly bounded by Lake George, the Norfolk Southern Railroad, Center Street and Second Street.


“Being on the registry is a big deal,” said Sergio Mendoza, Hobart’s city planner. “It’s good for the city, and it is a nice thing for Northwest Indiana to have another location on the national registry.”


If approved, the district would join other communities with nationally recognized historic downtowns, including the Crown Point Courthouse Square, downtown Valparaiso, Chesterton Downtown Historic District and Hammond Hohman Avenue and State Street, said Tiffany Tolbert, director of Indiana Landmarks Northwest field office.


The city of Hobart bestowed a local historical designation a few years ago, and the request for national designation was made by the Hobart Redevelopment Commission with the help of Indiana Landmarks‘ Partners in Preservation National Register program.


Tolbert said the listing on the national registry is an honorary designation, but offers incentives including federal rehabilitation tax credits for commercially used buildings and historic preservation grant funding.


“By achieving the designation, the city will be in a position to utilize these incentives, when appropriate,” she said, adding it will help with downtown revitalization efforts.


The city is creating a new, 10-year comprehensive plan, which will be released next year and will run through 2025. Mendoza said the comprehensive plan will have a chapter dedicated to historic preservation.


“We want to have guidelines on how to preserve the area and explore any opportunities that are out there,” he said.



This entry was posted in :