Tuesday, July 29, 2014


When their teams gather for this first time this year, Hobart College coaches will put extra emphasis on appropriate behavior and sexual assault prevention, Athletic Director Mike Hanna says.


“We have outstanding student-athletes who are dedicated to leading a life that’s guided by respect and loyalty and teamwork and trust, which are the values of Hobart and William Smith athletics, and we are always striving to get better,” he said, adding that athletes at HWS do not get treated differently than other students.


Hanna spoke to the Finger Lakes Times Thursday in response to the recent New York Times article detailing sexual assault allegations made last year against three football players.


The Colleges’ on-campus adjudication panel cleared the players, and police filed no charges. However, The New York Times story questioned the effectiveness of both the on-campus process and the police investigation.


Hanna declined to discuss any details of that case, including the appropriateness of the Athletic Department’s response, how it applied its procedures to the accused players and the reaction among student-athletes. Nor would he comment on a locker-room meeting between the accused players, a witness, two of the football team’s captains and coach Mike Cragg that The New York Times said took place following the alleged assault.


However, Hanna did discuss in general terms how the Athletic Department responds when someone makes allegations against a student-athlete, as well as the efforts he said his department will make to prevent sexual assaults.


Hanna said the department and the Colleges’ student athletes will be able to make improvements and move on successfully as the school year starts, despite the impact of the case and the publicity generated by the article.


“It’s easy to move on because we have great people here, and we’re committed to one another,” he said. “We have a special mission within the educational mission of Hobart and William Smith Colleges. It’s not a job for our people. It’s a calling. With that level of commitment, whether it’s a Hobart basketball game or a Hobart lacrosse game or daily life, there will be adversity. We get knocked down, but we always get up, and we get better — and we will do that in this case.”


Codes of conduct


Student-athletes have been subject to a code of conduct for decades. A Student Athlete Advisory Council consisting of one athlete from each team maintains the code. While the Council itself does not address code violations, it does create expectations and guidelines.


Hanna said each coach also has his or her own set of expectations, which team captains help to shape each year.


“We have a number of guiding processes here, but certainly the Colleges’ Community Standards Handbook is the overarching handbook,” Hanna said.


When violations occur, the process depends on the specific case.


“It’s situational,” Hanna said. “First and foremost, student-athletes are students at Hobart and William Smith Colleges, so the normal process ... the Colleges use for reviewing any case is what’s followed, and then we cooperate and communicate.”


The Athletic Department can generally impose sanctions on a student-athlete outside of or in addition to that adjudication process, Hanna said. Coaches in the past have taken students out of the lineup to allow them to focus on academics even when the Colleges did not place them on academic probation, he said.


Coaches also talk among themselves to see how their peers have handled a given situation in the past, Hanna said. That helps ensure consistency.


Doing better


Hanna said the Athlete Advisory Council reviews the code of conduct each year. Coaches and the Athletic Department also review their policies and procedures. All of that will happen again this year, with the recent assault allegations in mind.


Hanna said the Colleges’ larger-scale review of its own policies and procedures will play into what his department does going forward.


“A lot of what’s in [the Athletic Department manual] is taken from the [Colleges’] Community Standards Handbook, so we’ll follow the Colleges’ lead on that to make sure we’re complying with the Colleges’ policies,” Hanna said. “It’ll be a very collaborative effort. It already is across campus.”


Hanna said the Athletic Department is willing to act quickly when it needs to make improvements. He cited its self-reporting of NCAA violations at the start of the 2008-09 academic year; the NCAA eventually penalized the Hobart football and lacrosse programs in January 2011.


He said the Colleges hired a full-time compliance officer, which he believes put them at the forefront in compliance-related issues.


“I think that’s an important telltale, that when we do have situations, we know how to handle them,” he said.


Hanna also cited the Athletic Department’s existing efforts to ensure that athletes behave appropriately, including the Napier Life Skills Seminar.


“It’s a very highly regarded life skills program,” Hanna said. “We use a combination of outside speakers, upperclassmen. It’s a very comprehensive program. In the last two years, our two points of focus have been respect and accountability. So we work hard at that. When families hand their sons and daughters over to us, it’s a big deal. It’s a huge responsibility.”


The Napier Seminar has been in place since 1996. Hanna said Colleges athletes also volunteer at Happiness House, at Relay For Life and for other causes.


Hanna said he and the coaches have been talking with student-athlete leaders, by phone and in person, since The New York Times article appeared.


“What they do realize, and what is a common thread in my conversations with them, they know that the core of what we do is dedicated to being a place of high character,” he said. “ ... This situation flies in the face of that feeling and the conviction, and whether [the situation is] losing a game or not getting the major gift for a stadium project, you hope to get it in the past and you have to move on and get better at whatever it is that has to be improved.”


Special treatment?


The response to The New York Times article has included online posts suggesting that athletes get away with things other students would not.


Hanna acknowledged that perception, but said it does not reflect the reality at a Division III school.


“The life of a student-athlete at a liberal arts, Division III school like Hobart and William Smith is considerably different than the life of a student-athlete at a Division I scholarship institution ... I think, unfortunately, most of our society doesn’t realize that there is true amateurism in sports in America, and it’s on the campus of Division III colleges,” said Hanna, who started coaching college sports in 1971.


Hobart’s lacrosse team plays at the NCAA Division I level, though it does not award athletic scholarships. The rest of its teams — along with all of the William Smith teams — play at the Division III level.


Hobart and William Smith athletes do not receive special treatment, Hanna said, whether it’s in registering for classes or in disciplinary procedures.


“I could be athletic director to 2071, and we’d still be facing that perception of student-athletes being favored,” he said. “All I can say is, I have great confidence in what we’re doing, the leadership of our coaches, the quality of our young men and women who are coming to these Colleges. We strive to uphold what’s right regardless of the popularity of the position. I think that’s a pretty good definition of being a Statesman.”



Athletic director says Hobart will improve, move on - Finger Lakes Times


When their teams gather for this first time this year, Hobart College coaches will put extra emphasis on appropriate behavior and sexual assault prevention, Athletic Director Mike Hanna says.


“We have outstanding student-athletes who are dedicated to leading a life that’s guided by respect and loyalty and teamwork and trust, which are the values of Hobart and William Smith athletics, and we are always striving to get better,” he said, adding that athletes at HWS do not get treated differently than other students.


Hanna spoke to the Finger Lakes Times Thursday in response to the recent New York Times article detailing sexual assault allegations made last year against three football players.


The Colleges’ on-campus adjudication panel cleared the players, and police filed no charges. However, The New York Times story questioned the effectiveness of both the on-campus process and the police investigation.


Hanna declined to discuss any details of that case, including the appropriateness of the Athletic Department’s response, how it applied its procedures to the accused players and the reaction among student-athletes. Nor would he comment on a locker-room meeting between the accused players, a witness, two of the football team’s captains and coach Mike Cragg that The New York Times said took place following the alleged assault.


However, Hanna did discuss in general terms how the Athletic Department responds when someone makes allegations against a student-athlete, as well as the efforts he said his department will make to prevent sexual assaults.


Hanna said the department and the Colleges’ student athletes will be able to make improvements and move on successfully as the school year starts, despite the impact of the case and the publicity generated by the article.


“It’s easy to move on because we have great people here, and we’re committed to one another,” he said. “We have a special mission within the educational mission of Hobart and William Smith Colleges. It’s not a job for our people. It’s a calling. With that level of commitment, whether it’s a Hobart basketball game or a Hobart lacrosse game or daily life, there will be adversity. We get knocked down, but we always get up, and we get better — and we will do that in this case.”


Codes of conduct


Student-athletes have been subject to a code of conduct for decades. A Student Athlete Advisory Council consisting of one athlete from each team maintains the code. While the Council itself does not address code violations, it does create expectations and guidelines.


Hanna said each coach also has his or her own set of expectations, which team captains help to shape each year.


“We have a number of guiding processes here, but certainly the Colleges’ Community Standards Handbook is the overarching handbook,” Hanna said.


When violations occur, the process depends on the specific case.


“It’s situational,” Hanna said. “First and foremost, student-athletes are students at Hobart and William Smith Colleges, so the normal process ... the Colleges use for reviewing any case is what’s followed, and then we cooperate and communicate.”


The Athletic Department can generally impose sanctions on a student-athlete outside of or in addition to that adjudication process, Hanna said. Coaches in the past have taken students out of the lineup to allow them to focus on academics even when the Colleges did not place them on academic probation, he said.


Coaches also talk among themselves to see how their peers have handled a given situation in the past, Hanna said. That helps ensure consistency.


Doing better


Hanna said the Athlete Advisory Council reviews the code of conduct each year. Coaches and the Athletic Department also review their policies and procedures. All of that will happen again this year, with the recent assault allegations in mind.


Hanna said the Colleges’ larger-scale review of its own policies and procedures will play into what his department does going forward.


“A lot of what’s in [the Athletic Department manual] is taken from the [Colleges’] Community Standards Handbook, so we’ll follow the Colleges’ lead on that to make sure we’re complying with the Colleges’ policies,” Hanna said. “It’ll be a very collaborative effort. It already is across campus.”


Hanna said the Athletic Department is willing to act quickly when it needs to make improvements. He cited its self-reporting of NCAA violations at the start of the 2008-09 academic year; the NCAA eventually penalized the Hobart football and lacrosse programs in January 2011.


He said the Colleges hired a full-time compliance officer, which he believes put them at the forefront in compliance-related issues.


“I think that’s an important telltale, that when we do have situations, we know how to handle them,” he said.


Hanna also cited the Athletic Department’s existing efforts to ensure that athletes behave appropriately, including the Napier Life Skills Seminar.


“It’s a very highly regarded life skills program,” Hanna said. “We use a combination of outside speakers, upperclassmen. It’s a very comprehensive program. In the last two years, our two points of focus have been respect and accountability. So we work hard at that. When families hand their sons and daughters over to us, it’s a big deal. It’s a huge responsibility.”


The Napier Seminar has been in place since 1996. Hanna said Colleges athletes also volunteer at Happiness House, at Relay For Life and for other causes.


Hanna said he and the coaches have been talking with student-athlete leaders, by phone and in person, since The New York Times article appeared.


“What they do realize, and what is a common thread in my conversations with them, they know that the core of what we do is dedicated to being a place of high character,” he said. “ ... This situation flies in the face of that feeling and the conviction, and whether [the situation is] losing a game or not getting the major gift for a stadium project, you hope to get it in the past and you have to move on and get better at whatever it is that has to be improved.”


Special treatment?


The response to The New York Times article has included online posts suggesting that athletes get away with things other students would not.


Hanna acknowledged that perception, but said it does not reflect the reality at a Division III school.


“The life of a student-athlete at a liberal arts, Division III school like Hobart and William Smith is considerably different than the life of a student-athlete at a Division I scholarship institution ... I think, unfortunately, most of our society doesn’t realize that there is true amateurism in sports in America, and it’s on the campus of Division III colleges,” said Hanna, who started coaching college sports in 1971.


Hobart’s lacrosse team plays at the NCAA Division I level, though it does not award athletic scholarships. The rest of its teams — along with all of the William Smith teams — play at the Division III level.


Hobart and William Smith athletes do not receive special treatment, Hanna said, whether it’s in registering for classes or in disciplinary procedures.


“I could be athletic director to 2071, and we’d still be facing that perception of student-athletes being favored,” he said. “All I can say is, I have great confidence in what we’re doing, the leadership of our coaches, the quality of our young men and women who are coming to these Colleges. We strive to uphold what’s right regardless of the popularity of the position. I think that’s a pretty good definition of being a Statesman.”



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Appeals court rules witness-juror spat could have influence Gerald Blasczyk's original trial.







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Associated Press 10:46 a.m. CDT July 29, 2014




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MADISON — A 60-year-old Hobart man will get a new trial on a drunken driving charge after a defense witness got into an argument with two jurors.


The state's 3rd District Court of Appeals ordered a new trial for Gerald Blasczyk on Tuesday.


Blasczyk was charged in May 2011 in Outagamie County with operating while intoxicated with 10 or more previous offenses after another driver found him passed out in his Jeep, which was still running.


A third man, Frank Vandehei, testified that he had been driving the Jeep, not Blasczyk. After testifying, Vandehei confronted a juror in the parking lot about a question the juror asked during his testimony. A second juror was there during the confrontation.


The appeals court said that confrontation could have influenced the jurors during deliberations, and Blasczyk deserves a new trial.


RELATED: Read the appeals court ruling


The May 2011 arrest was Blasczyk's 13th OWI offense.


Read or Share this story: http://gbpg.net/1mZ5seA




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Hobart man gets new trial on 13th OWI - Green Bay Press Gazette







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Hobart man gets new trial on 13th OWI


Appeals court rules witness-juror spat could have influence Gerald Blasczyk's original trial.







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Associated Press 10:46 a.m. CDT July 29, 2014




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MADISON — A 60-year-old Hobart man will get a new trial on a drunken driving charge after a defense witness got into an argument with two jurors.


The state's 3rd District Court of Appeals ordered a new trial for Gerald Blasczyk on Tuesday.


Blasczyk was charged in May 2011 in Outagamie County with operating while intoxicated with 10 or more previous offenses after another driver found him passed out in his Jeep, which was still running.


A third man, Frank Vandehei, testified that he had been driving the Jeep, not Blasczyk. After testifying, Vandehei confronted a juror in the parking lot about a question the juror asked during his testimony. A second juror was there during the confrontation.


The appeals court said that confrontation could have influenced the jurors during deliberations, and Blasczyk deserves a new trial.


RELATED: Read the appeals court ruling


The May 2011 arrest was Blasczyk's 13th OWI offense.


Read or Share this story: http://gbpg.net/1mZ5seA




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James Goodman, Staff writer 10:49 p.m. EDT July 24, 2014




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Students and alumni of Hobart and William Smith Colleges are urging changes in how allegations of sexual misconduct are handled in the aftermath of a recent New York Times story telling how the colleges mishandled a rape complaint by a student.


Hobart and William Smith officials have defended their response to a rape of an 18-year-old freshman that is alleged to have happened at the outset of last school year. The student, identified as Anna, reported that three football players sexually assaulted her at a fraternity party. A disciplinary panel at the Geneva-based colleges cleared the students of wrongdoing. No criminal charges were filed.


But Hobart and William Smith officials, while disputing the Times' interpretation of events and portrayal of the colleges, say that changes are forthcoming.


"There will be changes in policies and procedures for adjudication of allegations of sexual misconduct. They will be in place before the fall semester," said Robert Flowers, vice president for student affairs at Hobart and William Smith and the official who reviewed the panel's finding that cleared the three students.


The Coalition of Concerned Students had 3,971 signatures Thursday on an online petition that says they are "horrified by the New York Times article exposing the administration's mismanagement of a campus sexual assault case."


Among the changes called for by the coalition is the appointment of "qualified individuals" to serve on the adjudication panel that reviews allegations of sexual assault.


Other changes sought include requiring the mandated rape prevention and student life seminars to focus on bystander intervention in such cases.


Another group, HWS Community for Change, was started by alumni of Hobart and William Smith. Its Facebook page, William Smith Stands with Anna, features five recommendations for Hobart and William Smith President Mark Gearan.


One of the recommendation is to "create transparency for and inclusion of stakeholders (students, faculty and alumni) in the review committee being assembled" to look at possible changes in procedures and policies.


Gretchen Sword, who is a 2006 Hobart and William Smith graduate and spokeswoman for Community for Change, said that her group and the students' group are collaborating.


"We are not only working together; we have a longer document that has been submitted to the leadership of the colleges," Sword said.


A meeting with representatives of both groups and the administration of Hobart and William Smith, Sword noted, is expected next week or the week after. It will not be open to the media.


"We would like to have a conversation that helps us understand what happened and how to move forward," she said.


David Grome, who is a 2007 Hobart and William Smith graduate, participated in the conference call that led to the Community for Change's recommendations.


"For me, it goes beyond the administration to the community. We all have to accept responsibility as members of the college's community to stay engaged in this," said Grome, 29, of Rochester.


In a July 16 letter to the Hobart and William Smith community, Gearan told of a group of faculty, staff, students and alumni working on a review of the colleges' processes for handling sexual misconduct cases.


"They will submit recommendations to me this summer," Gearan said.


Hobart and William Smith's prevention and education curriculum on issues related to sexual misconduct will be expanded.


Additional training will be provided for those involved with the response, investigation and adjudication of sexual misconduct complaints, Gearan noted.


As it is, lawyers not on the staff of Hobart and William Smith have been investigating sexual misconduct allegations since last fall, Flowers said.


The national spotlight has focused on Hobart and William Smith at a time sexual misconduct on campuses is coming under greater scrutiny.


On Thursday, Ohio State University fired the director of its marching band, Jonathan Waters, as it is expanding an internal investigation that found a deep culture of sexual harassment among students, reported The Columbus Dispatch.


The ouster of Waters came after a two-month probe, triggered by a complaint by a parent, that revealed extensive evidence that students routinely harassed one another — with new band members often targeted — and that Waters was aware or should have known about the abuse.


A new report released by Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., found that many of America's colleges and universities are failing to comply with federal laws and key policies designed to combat sexual assault on their campuses.


Her office polled 350 institutions of higher education and found major gaps in how schools report, investigate and resolve allegations of rape on college campuses.


Among the findings:


• Universities don't know the scope of the problem. Only 16 percent of schools conduct so-called climate surveys aimed at determining the prevalence of sexual assault on campus.


• Many schools do not make it easy for victims to report attacks anonymously. Only about half of U.S. colleges have a hotline that victims can call to report a sexual assault.


• Sexual assault charges often are not investigated. More than 40 percent of schools said they had not conducted a single sexual assault investigation in the past five years, even though some of those same institutions reported sexual violence incidents to the U.S. Department of Education in that same period.


• Many schools do not provide training to faculty, staff or students. About 20 percent of universities said they don't provide training to faculty and staff for how to respond to a sexual assault allegation.


"These problems affect nearly every stage of the institutions' response to sexual violence," the report concludes. "Many institutions are failing to comply with the law and best practices in how they handle sexual violence among students."


JGOODMAN@Democratand Chronicle.com


http://ift.tt/1vmdLIW


Includes reporting by Deirdre Shesgreen of the Gannett Washington bureau.


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Read or Share this story: http://on.rocne.ws/1mJlr06



Hobart and William Smith Colleges to change policies on sex misconduct cases - Rochester Democrat and Chronicle

James Goodman, Staff writer 10:49 p.m. EDT July 24, 2014




28 1 LINKEDIN MORE

Students and alumni of Hobart and William Smith Colleges are urging changes in how allegations of sexual misconduct are handled in the aftermath of a recent New York Times story telling how the colleges mishandled a rape complaint by a student.


Hobart and William Smith officials have defended their response to a rape of an 18-year-old freshman that is alleged to have happened at the outset of last school year. The student, identified as Anna, reported that three football players sexually assaulted her at a fraternity party. A disciplinary panel at the Geneva-based colleges cleared the students of wrongdoing. No criminal charges were filed.


But Hobart and William Smith officials, while disputing the Times' interpretation of events and portrayal of the colleges, say that changes are forthcoming.


"There will be changes in policies and procedures for adjudication of allegations of sexual misconduct. They will be in place before the fall semester," said Robert Flowers, vice president for student affairs at Hobart and William Smith and the official who reviewed the panel's finding that cleared the three students.


The Coalition of Concerned Students had 3,971 signatures Thursday on an online petition that says they are "horrified by the New York Times article exposing the administration's mismanagement of a campus sexual assault case."


Among the changes called for by the coalition is the appointment of "qualified individuals" to serve on the adjudication panel that reviews allegations of sexual assault.


Other changes sought include requiring the mandated rape prevention and student life seminars to focus on bystander intervention in such cases.


Another group, HWS Community for Change, was started by alumni of Hobart and William Smith. Its Facebook page, William Smith Stands with Anna, features five recommendations for Hobart and William Smith President Mark Gearan.


One of the recommendation is to "create transparency for and inclusion of stakeholders (students, faculty and alumni) in the review committee being assembled" to look at possible changes in procedures and policies.


Gretchen Sword, who is a 2006 Hobart and William Smith graduate and spokeswoman for Community for Change, said that her group and the students' group are collaborating.


"We are not only working together; we have a longer document that has been submitted to the leadership of the colleges," Sword said.


A meeting with representatives of both groups and the administration of Hobart and William Smith, Sword noted, is expected next week or the week after. It will not be open to the media.


"We would like to have a conversation that helps us understand what happened and how to move forward," she said.


David Grome, who is a 2007 Hobart and William Smith graduate, participated in the conference call that led to the Community for Change's recommendations.


"For me, it goes beyond the administration to the community. We all have to accept responsibility as members of the college's community to stay engaged in this," said Grome, 29, of Rochester.


In a July 16 letter to the Hobart and William Smith community, Gearan told of a group of faculty, staff, students and alumni working on a review of the colleges' processes for handling sexual misconduct cases.


"They will submit recommendations to me this summer," Gearan said.


Hobart and William Smith's prevention and education curriculum on issues related to sexual misconduct will be expanded.


Additional training will be provided for those involved with the response, investigation and adjudication of sexual misconduct complaints, Gearan noted.


As it is, lawyers not on the staff of Hobart and William Smith have been investigating sexual misconduct allegations since last fall, Flowers said.


The national spotlight has focused on Hobart and William Smith at a time sexual misconduct on campuses is coming under greater scrutiny.


On Thursday, Ohio State University fired the director of its marching band, Jonathan Waters, as it is expanding an internal investigation that found a deep culture of sexual harassment among students, reported The Columbus Dispatch.


The ouster of Waters came after a two-month probe, triggered by a complaint by a parent, that revealed extensive evidence that students routinely harassed one another — with new band members often targeted — and that Waters was aware or should have known about the abuse.


A new report released by Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., found that many of America's colleges and universities are failing to comply with federal laws and key policies designed to combat sexual assault on their campuses.


Her office polled 350 institutions of higher education and found major gaps in how schools report, investigate and resolve allegations of rape on college campuses.


Among the findings:


• Universities don't know the scope of the problem. Only 16 percent of schools conduct so-called climate surveys aimed at determining the prevalence of sexual assault on campus.


• Many schools do not make it easy for victims to report attacks anonymously. Only about half of U.S. colleges have a hotline that victims can call to report a sexual assault.


• Sexual assault charges often are not investigated. More than 40 percent of schools said they had not conducted a single sexual assault investigation in the past five years, even though some of those same institutions reported sexual violence incidents to the U.S. Department of Education in that same period.


• Many schools do not provide training to faculty, staff or students. About 20 percent of universities said they don't provide training to faculty and staff for how to respond to a sexual assault allegation.


"These problems affect nearly every stage of the institutions' response to sexual violence," the report concludes. "Many institutions are failing to comply with the law and best practices in how they handle sexual violence among students."


JGOODMAN@Democratand Chronicle.com


http://ift.tt/1vmdLIW


Includes reporting by Deirdre Shesgreen of the Gannett Washington bureau.


28 1 LINKEDIN MORE

Read or Share this story: http://on.rocne.ws/1mJlr06



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2014-hobart-boozfest-flyer Limited Amount of BOOZFEST 2014 VIP Tickets Still Available!

BOOZFEST will be Friday, October 17th, at the Radisson


The Hobart Chamber's new and exciting fall event will feature local craft brewers and wineries with tastings, live entertainment, giveaways, and more. Our vendors include One Trick Pony, Transient Artisan Ales, The Devil's Trumpet Brewing Company, Ironwood Brewing Company, 18th Street Brewery, Burn 'Em Brewing, People's Brewing Company, Beer Geeks, Journeyman Distillery, Anderson Winery, Cooper's Hawk, and Shady Creek Winery! ChicagoLand Popcorn will also be selling popcorn!


VIP tickets are still available and include unlimited beer, wine, and liquor samples, commemorative beer glass, goodie bag, lanyard with glass holder, hour early entry, and a commemorative t-shirt.


Also included in VIP tickets is a full buffet prepared by TJ Moloney's and the Radisson chef. Menu will include:


Black angus sliders with Indiana micro brewed vidalia onion jam, wild mushrooms, aged cheddar

Guennes BBQ pulled pork sliders with fennel apple slaw

Turkey sliders with avocado and lemon aioli

Smoked summer sausage with stone-ground mustard and carmelized onions

Apple wood smoked chicken sausage with pecan bacon jam

Three Floyds braised bratwurst with smoked gouda fondue

Bacon and truffle scented fresh cut fries


Buy Your VIP Tickets Here


Good Life Awards

August 5th


This event is sponsored by NWIndianaLife.com (Ideas in Motion). It is an awards ceremony honoring six individuals who have impacted the "LIFE" networks in a positive way all while raising money for A Positive Approach to Teen Health and the La Porte County YMCA. Both U.S. Congressman Pete Visclosky and Indiana Senator Edward Charbonneau will be the keynote speakers as well.


Buy Your Tickets Here


College of Court Reporting Halves Tuition for Onsite Students

Since 1984, College of Court Reporting (CCR) has developed a reputation as an innovator in post-secondary education. The school is thinking outside the box once again by lowering its tuition for students who wish to attend school onsite full-time. Starting for the Fall 2014 semester, CCR will cut its tuition rate from $350 per credit hour down to $175 per credit hour for local students.


From becoming one of the first colleges in the nation to offer an online court reporting program to developing a unique method of assessing students' progress, CCR has gone against the grain to create the best learning environment possible for its students. Now, the school has recognized the need for new reporters in the Chicagoland area, especially in the areas of Official Reporting and the growing field of Broadcast Captioning. Over the course of the next 15 years, the state of Illinois has estimated it will need to hire almost 400 new court reporters as approximately 75% of its staff is retiring. To meet this need, the College seeks to increase its enrollment by lowering its tuition. "One of the biggest obstacles students face is how to pay for their education, we lowered our tuition to assist students in overcoming this obstacle," says Nicky Rodriquez, Director of Admissions. "We have a need for court reporters in the Chicagoland area and CCR wants to fill those positions,"


This approach is by no means conventional: The trend in post-secondary education cost has been rising tuition rates--public institutions raising tuition by 172 percent from 2001-02 to 2012, after adjustments for inflation. Hopefully, CCR's approach to reducing costs will spur a revitalized interest in careers in court reporting.


College of Court Reporting was the first online program in the country to be certified by the National Court Reporters Association. With the help of CCR's innovative minute-by-minute evaluation method, the College now maintains one of the highest graduation rates amongst court reporting schools nationally. For more information on furthering your education, contact Nicky at 866-294-3974 ext. 222.


Important Upcoming Meetings and Events

BoozFest Committee Meeting - Tuesday, August 5th, 10am

Good Life Awards - Tuesday, August 5th, 6-9pm (see link below)

Pig Roast Committee Meeting - Friday, August 8th, 10am

Pig Roast Committee Meeting - Thursday, August 14th, 10am

Hobart Chamber of Commerce Annual Pig Roast - Sunday, August 17th, 11am-3pm, Festival Park

Ribbon Cutting at State Farm Insurance - Glenn Barath - Friday, August 22nd, 10am

"Casual Conversation" Networking Breakfast - Wednesday, August 27th, 8:30am


Hobart Chamber Newsletter: July 29, 2014

Hobart Chamber of Commerce

1001 Lillian St.

Hobart, Indiana 46342

219.942.5774

Visit NAME's Website

Visit NAME's Partner Profile



Proud Marketing Partner of ValpoLife.com


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Hobart Chamber Newsletter: July 29, 2014 - ValpoLife.com





2014-hobart-boozfest-flyer Limited Amount of BOOZFEST 2014 VIP Tickets Still Available!

BOOZFEST will be Friday, October 17th, at the Radisson


The Hobart Chamber's new and exciting fall event will feature local craft brewers and wineries with tastings, live entertainment, giveaways, and more. Our vendors include One Trick Pony, Transient Artisan Ales, The Devil's Trumpet Brewing Company, Ironwood Brewing Company, 18th Street Brewery, Burn 'Em Brewing, People's Brewing Company, Beer Geeks, Journeyman Distillery, Anderson Winery, Cooper's Hawk, and Shady Creek Winery! ChicagoLand Popcorn will also be selling popcorn!


VIP tickets are still available and include unlimited beer, wine, and liquor samples, commemorative beer glass, goodie bag, lanyard with glass holder, hour early entry, and a commemorative t-shirt.


Also included in VIP tickets is a full buffet prepared by TJ Moloney's and the Radisson chef. Menu will include:


Black angus sliders with Indiana micro brewed vidalia onion jam, wild mushrooms, aged cheddar

Guennes BBQ pulled pork sliders with fennel apple slaw

Turkey sliders with avocado and lemon aioli

Smoked summer sausage with stone-ground mustard and carmelized onions

Apple wood smoked chicken sausage with pecan bacon jam

Three Floyds braised bratwurst with smoked gouda fondue

Bacon and truffle scented fresh cut fries


Buy Your VIP Tickets Here


Good Life Awards

August 5th


This event is sponsored by NWIndianaLife.com (Ideas in Motion). It is an awards ceremony honoring six individuals who have impacted the "LIFE" networks in a positive way all while raising money for A Positive Approach to Teen Health and the La Porte County YMCA. Both U.S. Congressman Pete Visclosky and Indiana Senator Edward Charbonneau will be the keynote speakers as well.


Buy Your Tickets Here


College of Court Reporting Halves Tuition for Onsite Students

Since 1984, College of Court Reporting (CCR) has developed a reputation as an innovator in post-secondary education. The school is thinking outside the box once again by lowering its tuition for students who wish to attend school onsite full-time. Starting for the Fall 2014 semester, CCR will cut its tuition rate from $350 per credit hour down to $175 per credit hour for local students.


From becoming one of the first colleges in the nation to offer an online court reporting program to developing a unique method of assessing students' progress, CCR has gone against the grain to create the best learning environment possible for its students. Now, the school has recognized the need for new reporters in the Chicagoland area, especially in the areas of Official Reporting and the growing field of Broadcast Captioning. Over the course of the next 15 years, the state of Illinois has estimated it will need to hire almost 400 new court reporters as approximately 75% of its staff is retiring. To meet this need, the College seeks to increase its enrollment by lowering its tuition. "One of the biggest obstacles students face is how to pay for their education, we lowered our tuition to assist students in overcoming this obstacle," says Nicky Rodriquez, Director of Admissions. "We have a need for court reporters in the Chicagoland area and CCR wants to fill those positions,"


This approach is by no means conventional: The trend in post-secondary education cost has been rising tuition rates--public institutions raising tuition by 172 percent from 2001-02 to 2012, after adjustments for inflation. Hopefully, CCR's approach to reducing costs will spur a revitalized interest in careers in court reporting.


College of Court Reporting was the first online program in the country to be certified by the National Court Reporters Association. With the help of CCR's innovative minute-by-minute evaluation method, the College now maintains one of the highest graduation rates amongst court reporting schools nationally. For more information on furthering your education, contact Nicky at 866-294-3974 ext. 222.


Important Upcoming Meetings and Events

BoozFest Committee Meeting - Tuesday, August 5th, 10am

Good Life Awards - Tuesday, August 5th, 6-9pm (see link below)

Pig Roast Committee Meeting - Friday, August 8th, 10am

Pig Roast Committee Meeting - Thursday, August 14th, 10am

Hobart Chamber of Commerce Annual Pig Roast - Sunday, August 17th, 11am-3pm, Festival Park

Ribbon Cutting at State Farm Insurance - Glenn Barath - Friday, August 22nd, 10am

"Casual Conversation" Networking Breakfast - Wednesday, August 27th, 8:30am


Hobart Chamber Newsletter: July 29, 2014

Hobart Chamber of Commerce

1001 Lillian St.

Hobart, Indiana 46342

219.942.5774

Visit NAME's Website

Visit NAME's Partner Profile



Proud Marketing Partner of ValpoLife.com


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This entry was posted in :

2014-07-27T00:00:00Z Hobart officials use public input to shape long-term planChas Reilly Times Correspondent nwitimes.com



HOBART | The city is reviewing information provided by residents as Hobart officials continue developing potential projects for the city’s 10-year comprehensive plan.


Residents have been answering questions using keypads and submitting written comments for the plan during meetings that started in late May. Land use, parks and recreation, environment and transportation were among topics examined during the sessions.


On Monday, residents learned a bit about the outcome of those meetings.


City Planner Sergio Mendoza said suggestions for future projects include implementing the Hobart Marsh Plan, widening Liverpool Road, creating more sidewalks and adding a bus service in Hobart.


Mendoza said he will begin working with city department heads to determine how to accomplish projects proposed by residents. He said the city also will identify possible funding sources for the projects.


Residents’ comments will be kept on file with the city. If grants are available for future projects, the comments will be helpful in demonstrating public support, Mendoza said.


Residents also have inquired about attracting new businesses in Hobart’s downtown area.


City Councilman Pete Mendez said the council has been proactive by offering incentives, but Hobart can’t force businesses to open downtown.


Hobart officials are working with Lake County Divers Supply to offer kayak and paddle-board rentals on Lake George as a way to attract more visitors.


Several residents at the parks and recreation session indicated they would like to see that project come to fruition, Mendoza said.


City officials said they are appreciative of feedback residents provided during recent sessions, and there are plans to gather additional information.


Mendoza said 36 percent of those participating in public input sessions were 50 to 64 years old. Nearly 40 percent of the participants were 65 or older.



Copyright 2014 nwitimes.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Hobart officials use public input to shape long-term plan - nwitimes.com

2014-07-27T00:00:00Z Hobart officials use public input to shape long-term planChas Reilly Times Correspondent nwitimes.com



HOBART | The city is reviewing information provided by residents as Hobart officials continue developing potential projects for the city’s 10-year comprehensive plan.


Residents have been answering questions using keypads and submitting written comments for the plan during meetings that started in late May. Land use, parks and recreation, environment and transportation were among topics examined during the sessions.


On Monday, residents learned a bit about the outcome of those meetings.


City Planner Sergio Mendoza said suggestions for future projects include implementing the Hobart Marsh Plan, widening Liverpool Road, creating more sidewalks and adding a bus service in Hobart.


Mendoza said he will begin working with city department heads to determine how to accomplish projects proposed by residents. He said the city also will identify possible funding sources for the projects.


Residents’ comments will be kept on file with the city. If grants are available for future projects, the comments will be helpful in demonstrating public support, Mendoza said.


Residents also have inquired about attracting new businesses in Hobart’s downtown area.


City Councilman Pete Mendez said the council has been proactive by offering incentives, but Hobart can’t force businesses to open downtown.


Hobart officials are working with Lake County Divers Supply to offer kayak and paddle-board rentals on Lake George as a way to attract more visitors.


Several residents at the parks and recreation session indicated they would like to see that project come to fruition, Mendoza said.


City officials said they are appreciative of feedback residents provided during recent sessions, and there are plans to gather additional information.


Mendoza said 36 percent of those participating in public input sessions were 50 to 64 years old. Nearly 40 percent of the participants were 65 or older.



Copyright 2014 nwitimes.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


This entry was posted in :

Scotland head out to field

Scotland will play matches in Australia and New Zealand later this year


© REUTERS / Action Images




Scotland will play four one-day games in Hobart and four in Christchurch as the four qualifiers get the opportunity to experience local conditions ahead of the 2015 World Cup .


While fellow qualifiers Ireland will be heading to Queensland, Hamilton and Lincoln, Scotland will play Tasmania and then go to Christchurch - where they won the ICC World Cup Qualifier earlier this year.


Afghanistan and the United Arab Emirates will also spend time in both countries in September and October as part of the International Cricket Council's (ICC) High Performance Programme (HPP).


"With only 200 days to go to the World Cup, excitement is building in the Scotland camp," head coach Grant Bradburn said.


"Players are well aware there will be healthy internal competition for places in the final 15, so every opportunity from here on in is critical for selection and preparation.


"The pre-World Cup tour to Australia and New Zealand is a valuable chance for all the associate teams to keep building playing experiences against quality opposition on conditions that we are likely to be challenged with come February.


"Together with the ICC we have been able to build a substantial preparation programme towards the World Cup.


"From a playing perspective we are expecting to be challenged with quality quick, swing bowling plus world class spin. These are two of the skill areas where the Scotland squad will be working hard to keep building our skills."


Scotland are in Pool A of the World Cup, and will play Afghanistan, Australia, Bangladesh, England, New Zealand and Sri Lanka once the tournament begins in February.


"Helping cricket’s top emerging nations to perform on the global stage is a key part of the ICC’s High Performance Programme, and these tours will provide a great opportunity for the four teams to gain valuable knowledge and experience of the conditions they will face during the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015," ICC chief executive David Richardson commented.


"All sides have a strong schedule of matches against high-level opposition, and we are grateful to Cricket Australia, New Zealand Cricket and their state and provincial associations for supporting the programme so fully."


© Cricket World 2014




Scotland Head For Hobart, Christchurch - Cricket World


Scotland head out to field

Scotland will play matches in Australia and New Zealand later this year


© REUTERS / Action Images




Scotland will play four one-day games in Hobart and four in Christchurch as the four qualifiers get the opportunity to experience local conditions ahead of the 2015 World Cup .


While fellow qualifiers Ireland will be heading to Queensland, Hamilton and Lincoln, Scotland will play Tasmania and then go to Christchurch - where they won the ICC World Cup Qualifier earlier this year.


Afghanistan and the United Arab Emirates will also spend time in both countries in September and October as part of the International Cricket Council's (ICC) High Performance Programme (HPP).


"With only 200 days to go to the World Cup, excitement is building in the Scotland camp," head coach Grant Bradburn said.


"Players are well aware there will be healthy internal competition for places in the final 15, so every opportunity from here on in is critical for selection and preparation.


"The pre-World Cup tour to Australia and New Zealand is a valuable chance for all the associate teams to keep building playing experiences against quality opposition on conditions that we are likely to be challenged with come February.


"Together with the ICC we have been able to build a substantial preparation programme towards the World Cup.


"From a playing perspective we are expecting to be challenged with quality quick, swing bowling plus world class spin. These are two of the skill areas where the Scotland squad will be working hard to keep building our skills."


Scotland are in Pool A of the World Cup, and will play Afghanistan, Australia, Bangladesh, England, New Zealand and Sri Lanka once the tournament begins in February.


"Helping cricket’s top emerging nations to perform on the global stage is a key part of the ICC’s High Performance Programme, and these tours will provide a great opportunity for the four teams to gain valuable knowledge and experience of the conditions they will face during the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015," ICC chief executive David Richardson commented.


"All sides have a strong schedule of matches against high-level opposition, and we are grateful to Cricket Australia, New Zealand Cricket and their state and provincial associations for supporting the programme so fully."


© Cricket World 2014




This entry was posted in :

Monday, July 28, 2014


When their teams gather for this first time this year, Hobart College coaches will put extra emphasis on appropriate behavior and sexual assault prevention, Athletic Director Mike Hanna says.


“We have outstanding student-athletes who are dedicated to leading a life that’s guided by respect and loyalty and teamwork and trust, which are the values of Hobart and William Smith athletics, and we are always striving to get better,” he said, adding that athletes at HWS do not get treated differently than other students.


Hanna spoke to the Finger Lakes Times Thursday in response to the recent New York Times article detailing sexual assault allegations made last year against three football players.


The Colleges’ on-campus adjudication panel cleared the players, and police filed no charges. However, The New York Times story questioned the effectiveness of both the on-campus process and the police investigation.


Hanna declined to discuss any details of that case, including the appropriateness of the Athletic Department’s response, how it applied its procedures to the accused players and the reaction among student-athletes. Nor would he comment on a locker-room meeting between the accused players, a witness, two of the football team’s captains and coach Mike Cragg that The New York Times said took place following the alleged assault.


However, Hanna did discuss in general terms how the Athletic Department responds when someone makes allegations against a student-athlete, as well as the efforts he said his department will make to prevent sexual assaults.


Hanna said the department and the Colleges’ student athletes will be able to make improvements and move on successfully as the school year starts, despite the impact of the case and the publicity generated by the article.


“It’s easy to move on because we have great people here, and we’re committed to one another,” he said. “We have a special mission within the educational mission of Hobart and William Smith Colleges. It’s not a job for our people. It’s a calling. With that level of commitment, whether it’s a Hobart basketball game or a Hobart lacrosse game or daily life, there will be adversity. We get knocked down, but we always get up, and we get better — and we will do that in this case.”


Codes of conduct


Student-athletes have been subject to a code of conduct for decades. A Student Athlete Advisory Council consisting of one athlete from each team maintains the code. While the Council itself does not address code violations, it does create expectations and guidelines.


Hanna said each coach also has his or her own set of expectations, which team captains help to shape each year.


“We have a number of guiding processes here, but certainly the Colleges’ Community Standards Handbook is the overarching handbook,” Hanna said.


When violations occur, the process depends on the specific case.


“It’s situational,” Hanna said. “First and foremost, student-athletes are students at Hobart and William Smith Colleges, so the normal process ... the Colleges use for reviewing any case is what’s followed, and then we cooperate and communicate.”


The Athletic Department can generally impose sanctions on a student-athlete outside of or in addition to that adjudication process, Hanna said. Coaches in the past have taken students out of the lineup to allow them to focus on academics even when the Colleges did not place them on academic probation, he said.


Coaches also talk among themselves to see how their peers have handled a given situation in the past, Hanna said. That helps ensure consistency.


Doing better


Hanna said the Athlete Advisory Council reviews the code of conduct each year. Coaches and the Athletic Department also review their policies and procedures. All of that will happen again this year, with the recent assault allegations in mind.


Hanna said the Colleges’ larger-scale review of its own policies and procedures will play into what his department does going forward.


“A lot of what’s in [the Athletic Department manual] is taken from the [Colleges’] Community Standards Handbook, so we’ll follow the Colleges’ lead on that to make sure we’re complying with the Colleges’ policies,” Hanna said. “It’ll be a very collaborative effort. It already is across campus.”


Hanna said the Athletic Department is willing to act quickly when it needs to make improvements. He cited its self-reporting of NCAA violations at the start of the 2008-09 academic year; the NCAA eventually penalized the Hobart football and lacrosse programs in January 2011.


He said the Colleges hired a full-time compliance officer, which he believes put them at the forefront in compliance-related issues.


“I think that’s an important telltale, that when we do have situations, we know how to handle them,” he said.


Hanna also cited the Athletic Department’s existing efforts to ensure that athletes behave appropriately, including the Napier Life Skills Seminar.


“It’s a very highly regarded life skills program,” Hanna said. “We use a combination of outside speakers, upperclassmen. It’s a very comprehensive program. In the last two years, our two points of focus have been respect and accountability. So we work hard at that. When families hand their sons and daughters over to us, it’s a big deal. It’s a huge responsibility.”


The Napier Seminar has been in place since 1996. Hanna said Colleges athletes also volunteer at Happiness House, at Relay For Life and for other causes.


Hanna said he and the coaches have been talking with student-athlete leaders, by phone and in person, since The New York Times article appeared.


“What they do realize, and what is a common thread in my conversations with them, they know that the core of what we do is dedicated to being a place of high character,” he said. “ ... This situation flies in the face of that feeling and the conviction, and whether [the situation is] losing a game or not getting the major gift for a stadium project, you hope to get it in the past and you have to move on and get better at whatever it is that has to be improved.”


Special treatment?


The response to The New York Times article has included online posts suggesting that athletes get away with things other students would not.


Hanna acknowledged that perception, but said it does not reflect the reality at a Division III school.


“The life of a student-athlete at a liberal arts, Division III school like Hobart and William Smith is considerably different than the life of a student-athlete at a Division I scholarship institution ... I think, unfortunately, most of our society doesn’t realize that there is true amateurism in sports in America, and it’s on the campus of Division III colleges,” said Hanna, who started coaching college sports in 1971.


Hobart’s lacrosse team plays at the NCAA Division I level, though it does not award athletic scholarships. The rest of its teams — along with all of the William Smith teams — play at the Division III level.


Hobart and William Smith athletes do not receive special treatment, Hanna said, whether it’s in registering for classes or in disciplinary procedures.


“I could be athletic director to 2071, and we’d still be facing that perception of student-athletes being favored,” he said. “All I can say is, I have great confidence in what we’re doing, the leadership of our coaches, the quality of our young men and women who are coming to these Colleges. We strive to uphold what’s right regardless of the popularity of the position. I think that’s a pretty good definition of being a Statesman.”



Athletic director says Hobart will improve, move on - Finger Lakes Times


When their teams gather for this first time this year, Hobart College coaches will put extra emphasis on appropriate behavior and sexual assault prevention, Athletic Director Mike Hanna says.


“We have outstanding student-athletes who are dedicated to leading a life that’s guided by respect and loyalty and teamwork and trust, which are the values of Hobart and William Smith athletics, and we are always striving to get better,” he said, adding that athletes at HWS do not get treated differently than other students.


Hanna spoke to the Finger Lakes Times Thursday in response to the recent New York Times article detailing sexual assault allegations made last year against three football players.


The Colleges’ on-campus adjudication panel cleared the players, and police filed no charges. However, The New York Times story questioned the effectiveness of both the on-campus process and the police investigation.


Hanna declined to discuss any details of that case, including the appropriateness of the Athletic Department’s response, how it applied its procedures to the accused players and the reaction among student-athletes. Nor would he comment on a locker-room meeting between the accused players, a witness, two of the football team’s captains and coach Mike Cragg that The New York Times said took place following the alleged assault.


However, Hanna did discuss in general terms how the Athletic Department responds when someone makes allegations against a student-athlete, as well as the efforts he said his department will make to prevent sexual assaults.


Hanna said the department and the Colleges’ student athletes will be able to make improvements and move on successfully as the school year starts, despite the impact of the case and the publicity generated by the article.


“It’s easy to move on because we have great people here, and we’re committed to one another,” he said. “We have a special mission within the educational mission of Hobart and William Smith Colleges. It’s not a job for our people. It’s a calling. With that level of commitment, whether it’s a Hobart basketball game or a Hobart lacrosse game or daily life, there will be adversity. We get knocked down, but we always get up, and we get better — and we will do that in this case.”


Codes of conduct


Student-athletes have been subject to a code of conduct for decades. A Student Athlete Advisory Council consisting of one athlete from each team maintains the code. While the Council itself does not address code violations, it does create expectations and guidelines.


Hanna said each coach also has his or her own set of expectations, which team captains help to shape each year.


“We have a number of guiding processes here, but certainly the Colleges’ Community Standards Handbook is the overarching handbook,” Hanna said.


When violations occur, the process depends on the specific case.


“It’s situational,” Hanna said. “First and foremost, student-athletes are students at Hobart and William Smith Colleges, so the normal process ... the Colleges use for reviewing any case is what’s followed, and then we cooperate and communicate.”


The Athletic Department can generally impose sanctions on a student-athlete outside of or in addition to that adjudication process, Hanna said. Coaches in the past have taken students out of the lineup to allow them to focus on academics even when the Colleges did not place them on academic probation, he said.


Coaches also talk among themselves to see how their peers have handled a given situation in the past, Hanna said. That helps ensure consistency.


Doing better


Hanna said the Athlete Advisory Council reviews the code of conduct each year. Coaches and the Athletic Department also review their policies and procedures. All of that will happen again this year, with the recent assault allegations in mind.


Hanna said the Colleges’ larger-scale review of its own policies and procedures will play into what his department does going forward.


“A lot of what’s in [the Athletic Department manual] is taken from the [Colleges’] Community Standards Handbook, so we’ll follow the Colleges’ lead on that to make sure we’re complying with the Colleges’ policies,” Hanna said. “It’ll be a very collaborative effort. It already is across campus.”


Hanna said the Athletic Department is willing to act quickly when it needs to make improvements. He cited its self-reporting of NCAA violations at the start of the 2008-09 academic year; the NCAA eventually penalized the Hobart football and lacrosse programs in January 2011.


He said the Colleges hired a full-time compliance officer, which he believes put them at the forefront in compliance-related issues.


“I think that’s an important telltale, that when we do have situations, we know how to handle them,” he said.


Hanna also cited the Athletic Department’s existing efforts to ensure that athletes behave appropriately, including the Napier Life Skills Seminar.


“It’s a very highly regarded life skills program,” Hanna said. “We use a combination of outside speakers, upperclassmen. It’s a very comprehensive program. In the last two years, our two points of focus have been respect and accountability. So we work hard at that. When families hand their sons and daughters over to us, it’s a big deal. It’s a huge responsibility.”


The Napier Seminar has been in place since 1996. Hanna said Colleges athletes also volunteer at Happiness House, at Relay For Life and for other causes.


Hanna said he and the coaches have been talking with student-athlete leaders, by phone and in person, since The New York Times article appeared.


“What they do realize, and what is a common thread in my conversations with them, they know that the core of what we do is dedicated to being a place of high character,” he said. “ ... This situation flies in the face of that feeling and the conviction, and whether [the situation is] losing a game or not getting the major gift for a stadium project, you hope to get it in the past and you have to move on and get better at whatever it is that has to be improved.”


Special treatment?


The response to The New York Times article has included online posts suggesting that athletes get away with things other students would not.


Hanna acknowledged that perception, but said it does not reflect the reality at a Division III school.


“The life of a student-athlete at a liberal arts, Division III school like Hobart and William Smith is considerably different than the life of a student-athlete at a Division I scholarship institution ... I think, unfortunately, most of our society doesn’t realize that there is true amateurism in sports in America, and it’s on the campus of Division III colleges,” said Hanna, who started coaching college sports in 1971.


Hobart’s lacrosse team plays at the NCAA Division I level, though it does not award athletic scholarships. The rest of its teams — along with all of the William Smith teams — play at the Division III level.


Hobart and William Smith athletes do not receive special treatment, Hanna said, whether it’s in registering for classes or in disciplinary procedures.


“I could be athletic director to 2071, and we’d still be facing that perception of student-athletes being favored,” he said. “All I can say is, I have great confidence in what we’re doing, the leadership of our coaches, the quality of our young men and women who are coming to these Colleges. We strive to uphold what’s right regardless of the popularity of the position. I think that’s a pretty good definition of being a Statesman.”



This entry was posted in :